Four fined for hunting violations

Four hunters have been fined a total of $6,000 after pleading guilty to a number of hunting violations in three separate incidents.
Scott J. Fall, 40, and Daniel P. Lorencz, 40, of Chesaning, Mich., were fined a total of $3,500.
Fall was fined $1,500 for trespassing to hunt, $500 for discharging a firearm without regard to people and property, and $500 for providing false information to an officer.
He’s also been banned from hunting for a year and must take the hunter safety course for Ontario, or the state he lives in, before re-applying for a licence in Ontario.
Lorencz, meanwhile, was fined $500 for trespassing to hunt and $500 for providing false information to an officer.
Court heard that on Nov. 7, Fall killed a buck deer on private property near Muriel Lake Road. Local landowners heard shots and called the Ministry of Natural Resources Kenora District office.
A conservation officer arrived and questioned the men, who claimed the deer was shot in a wooded area and had run across the road and died.
Conservation officers conducted an investigation that revealed the events could not have occurred as described by the hunters.
The hunters then confessed the deer was shot in an open field with buildings nearby, and with “no hunting” and “no trespassing” signs prominently displayed.
In a second case, William J. Fish, 81, of Swanton, Vt., was fined $2,000 for discharging a firearm without due care and attention to people and property.
He also has been banned from hunting in Ontario for a year and must take the hunter safety course before re-applying for a licence.
On the morning of Nov. 3, Fish shot a deer on the Olson Road in a rural residential area when residents were going to work and the school bus was on its route.
And in a third case, William M. Candline, 48, of Kenora, was fined $500 for trespassing to hunt.
His firearm will be returned when the fine is paid.
On Nov. 4, Candline shot a deer on private property near School Road, east of the Coker Road junction. The property was posted with “no trespassing” signs.
In all the cases, the deer were forfeited to the Crown and donated to a charitable food program.
The Ministry of Natural Resources reminds the public that hunters must get permission from landowners to hunt on private land, and must obey “no trespassing” and “no hunting” signs posted on private land.
In addition, regulations that prohibit hunters from discharging a firearm on or across a roadway or in populated areas protect hunters as well as the public.
To report a natural resources violation, call toll-free 1-877-TIPS-MNR (847-7667) any time or contact your local MNR office during regular business hours.
You also can call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).


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