The wonders of grandchildren

My granddaughter is visiting, and she will be nine months old in less than a week. I am completely fascinated by her and I hope she is equally fascinated by me. She is talking in the background to one of her toys or stuffed animals and she uses different sounds as she speaks to each item on the floor.
She is not crawling yet but has figured a system of squirming and turning and stretching to move about to grab on to different things. She regularly attempts to move forward on her hands and knees, but at the last moment she backs off fearing she will lose her balance.
We have watched as she has discovered that using both hands makes it easier to open a box and look inside or to pick different shaped and colored blocks out of a turtle. She has even begun figuring out that different shapes go back through different holes in the turtle’s body.
When our sons were infants and toddlers, I don’t remember many of their stages of discovery. It seems all a blur to me today. There are incidents that I recall, but I don’t remember them learning to sit up. It seemed like magic and then it was off to the races on their hands and knees and climbing up and down stairs understanding that they could go up head-first but had to back down in reverse motion. One day they could move along furniture standing up and the next they walked across the room.
Infants and toddlers learn through discovery and practice. They seem to take each day as a new challenge trying to do something new.
I agree with my son that I would like to spend five minutes inside by granddaughter’s mind to understand everything that is going on. I probably wouldn’t be able to keep up with all the thoughts that pass through her mind in any single minute.
Her father had her in swimming lessons when she was only three months old and she totally loves the water whether it is in a small pool, the tub or even sitting on a beach in Rainy Lake. She splashes, kicks and squeals in delight at the tornado of water that she seems to throw in all direction. Everyone gets soaked.
Infants change so much from day to day, from week to week and parents discover so much about their new children. As a grandparent I am beginning to really appreciate the saying that being a grandparent is the best part of being a parent. My granddaughter is proving the truth of the saying. Her short two-week stay will end in only a few days and we will miss her sounds in the house immediately.