The industry-wide fix has become standard

I’ve been using the same software on my computer for almost a decade. It has performed flawlessly and I am very comfortable doing it.
However, with the latest update in the OS system, I’m now getting messages that the applications I’ve been using for so long no longer are compatible.
It is frustrating! I did one update too many.
I went to operate the old Word program and it told me that it is a 32-bit operation. But the OS update now operates at 64 bit and is too fast for that old program, which operated without problems up until the first of December.
Excel, Power Point, and the Adobe Suite of programs all give me the same message. I can open some documents but when I go to print, the program crashes and asks me if I want to send a message to the developers of the program to let them know where the fatal flaw exists.
Somewhere along the timeline, most software businesses and folks decided the improvements to software were going unused and the need to purchase new software hardly seemed useful. As long as everything worked, you were happy.
Software sales of programs for business and industry declined, as did computer sales. The strategy of those industries changed.
One used to buy a program and the cost was fixed. It was a one-time-only fee. But software developers learned from gaming software that if you licence the user annually or with each improvement, you could be paid again.
Gone are the days for using software for a decade or more. Miss an annual payment and the software immediately stops working.
To add insult to injury, the new software is not compatible with other software that we use to produce the newspaper each week. It no longer is a matter of installing the software on a computer when the old computer has failed.
Now you must buy new equipment and software for all the stations in the newspaper. Instead of a single payment for the software, annually you rent it again and again.
The fix was in place. It is almost industry-wide. It has become the standard.