New sights to ponder each week

There are now windrows of golden oats ready to be combined in fields west of Fort Frances while fields of golden barley are ready to harvested.
I’ve driven by these fields almost every week for a year now and watched how the earth has turned to vibrant green, canola has produced its vibrant yellow flowers, and fields that held hay have been cut, with the hay turned into huge round bales and taken off for storage.
The corn growing close to the highway at the agricultural research station just west of Emo now towers more than six feet high. The soy bean plants continue to be forest green while the edamame seeds shortly will be turning brown to be harvested in September as soy beans.
More fields continue to have tile drainage installed. Several huge rolls of pink tile wait to be put into the ground. On the opposite side of the highway, huge rolls of green tile await a similar fate.
Fields that earlier this year saw drainage tile installed now are being plowed and disked. The deep black soil is attracting gulls, which feed on the worms brought to the surface.
Cattle are back roaming the fields that recently were hay fields. The calves and their mothers move across the fields like mowers feeding on the tender shoots of hay that keeps growing.
I’ve watched these fields through almost four season as I make a weekly run to Rainy River dropping off newspapers to dealers each Wednesday afternoon. I’ve been slowed by construction as the west creek in Emo was completed and another just before Rainy was finished last fall.
For several weeks, I was slowed by paving contractors rebuilding the highway west of Emo to almost Rainy River.
Now three sets of lights await me–the first at the Kitchen Creek Golf Course, the next at the east creek between the Emo Inn and Cloverleaf Grocery, and the third just before Pinewood.
Large crews are found at all three locations rushing to finish the project before the snow flies and the ground again freezes up.
District fields show distinct features in each of the four seasons. After the crops were off at the research station, Canada geese cleaned up all the fallen seed.
Does and their fawns appear in the fall in fields and disappear at the first sound of a gunshot on the opening of deer season, only to reappear to feast on the first greens of spring on the north side of the highway.
In good weather with clear roads, the round trip takes just over three hours. In heavy rain or driving snow and wind, the trip can last almost four hours.
Each week my wife who travels with me, and together we discover new sights and delights to ponder over.