Standard passports may be easier for businesses

In my column last week, I wrote of tough love and the shunning of non vaccinated people. On Sunday, Jason Kenney in a radio broadcast in Calgary said a rather profound statement. Kenney rejected the idea of “Hard Lockdowns” in Alberta as a way of controlling the spread of Covid, since it would punish those who are vaccinated and have little impact on those who are refusing to be vaccinated.

With ICU beds in Alberta only becoming available when patients die, I do not accept his decision on not reinstating lockdowns. The number of cases in Alberta has continued to grow. I believe that lockdowns have worked well in Ontario and have had a positive impact on reducing the number of Covid cases in Ontario.

Last Wednesday, Ontario placed more restrictions on residents. As of last Wednesday, Ontarians will be required to provide proof of double vaccination (plus 14 days) along with photo ID. Proof of vaccinations will now be required for being inside at restaurants, bars, gyms, public meeting rooms and conference centres. The province has transferred the enforcement of the new rules to businesses. It is an additional burden on Ontario businesses.

Those businesses will be checked to see that they are following the Ontario Health rules making sure customers are checked for vaccine compliance every time they enter a business.

Each province is now implementing their own passport system. It will be confusing to check the different certificates by businesses. It would be much better that the Federal government issued a Canada wide Covid passport, choosing the method of one of the provinces that have already created a passport system. The passport does not have to be created again.

An on-line poll that ran between September 10-12, found that three of four Canadians are angry at persons who have not been vaccinated. The survey found that many vaccinated Canadians found unvaccinated Canadians as selfish and irresponsible. The results are contested by the unvaccinated. These divisions have played out between friends, family, and workers. It is another division of people in Canada.

We would like to hope that this pandemic will end soon. We have reached a stage of herd immunity, and yet we are witnessing a fourth wave of the disease. Perhaps when we can vaccinate children 5 through 11, the number of cases will decline. Perhaps we will reach a point where the Covid virus will be like the flu virus, and we will learn to live with it and take annual shots to prevent catching the disease.

We also know that without the world population becoming inoculated that mutations will continue to occur and will come back to haunt us. We don’t know when this will end, but we do know that as more people who become vaccinated, the mutation of the disease will decrease.

Former Publisher
Fort Frances Times