Finding the new normal through chaos

As we self-hibernate, we can try to make our lives as normal as possible. Take for instance International Day of Pink, which occurs on April 8 this year. Unfortunately, many events surrounding Day of Pink have been cancelled. The Day of Pink, also known as Pink Shirt Day, began in 2007, when two students took a stand against homophobic bullying, after a peer was bullied for wearing a pink shirt. The Day of Pink aims to create an atmosphere in schools, workplaces and communities that all people feel safe, valued and respected.
In our households as we self-quarantine, it may be more difficult to feel both safe and valued as the news surrounding us tells us how dangerous this new virus is to each of us. The virus also allows us to experience how frequently many within our community do not feel safe and valued every day.
Day of Pink activities may be reduced, but we can show everyone in our community that we support the Day of Pink by putting drawings, pink shirts, and lights in our windows or yards. A simple act of lighting our yards, similarly as we do at Christmas would be a symbol that we believe that our anxiety will pass. Our action would be a symbol that we believe that although life is difficult for us today, we believe that our future will be better. Pink shirt day is a simple action that says, we refuse to allow any type of bullying or fear anywhere in our community.
The President of the United States has extended the self-isolation through to April 30. I expect that both the federal and provincial leaders will make similar extensions that may extend through the end of June.
Those extensions will make life even more difficult for families and those who continue going to work every day. Life will provide us with more challenges.
In just three short weeks, the world will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day on April 22. Spring is the time for clean-up of yards and boulevards. As appreciation for Earth Day, it provides every one of us to make our community more beautiful cleaning up the dirt of winter. Older residents can be offered help to rake the leaves and grass in their yards. Our community can be the cleanest and most beautiful in the region. Clean-up is an opportunity to move out of doors with our families and become more active. It is the opportunity to reconnect with neighbors across property lines and learn how each of us is fairing under the constraints of self-isolation.
Eventually the self-isolation and the fear of “COVID-19” will end, but what we have learned about fear and anxiety will be remembered for decades to come.


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