You must respect others to gain respect

Aretha Franklin, in her lyrics for “Respect,” demands the respect of her man. It is a strong, provocative message which gained prominence during the civil rights and women’s rights movements in the United States in the late 1960s.
The secondary teachers of the Rainy River District also are asking for respect from the board.
In both the lyrics of Aretha Franklin and Otis Redding, who wrote the song, one is from the perspective of a hard-working man who is seeking respect for all of his work that he contributes to the family; the other version is of a strong woman who is seeking respect from her man.
The Fort Frances High School graduation ceremony is next Thursday (June 23) and it always has been tradition that the teachers stand with the graduates. It is a ceremony that occurs across the province and the country, and includes colleges and universities.
But this year, local secondary teachers are choosing to boycott and not support the graduation ceremony.
Through tradition, the graduation ceremony is an opportunity for teachers to show respect to the graduates who they have taught and mentored. It is the opportunity for the teachers to applaud and recognize the excellence of the student body and the families of the graduates.
This year, that respect, applause, and admiration for the graduating class is being withdrawn (the union has given permission to teachers to attend from the stands should one of their own children be graduating, but in no way are to participate in the ceremony).
The teachers’ union continues to request support of the community in its negotiations with the board, but have withdrawn support to the student body beyond their 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. days.
At one time, it was clear that the teachers were present to support the students. Today one wonders if that remains the case.
For the secondary teachers who are asking for respect, as did the version sung by Aretha Franklin that became rallying cries for the women’s and civil rights movements, they have forgotten that to gain respect, you have to respect others.
Clearly in this case, the teachers seem not ready to respect the achievements of either their students or their tax-paying parents.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail