Will lacking by feds to move on pipelines

Each Wednesday I travel between Fort Frances and Rainy River delivering the Fort Frances Times to our news dealers.
Often in travelling the route with my wife, new ideas are floated about the crops that are being grown, fields that are being cleared, and the quality of herds that exist along the highway.
We cross the railroad tracks four times in going to Rainy River and three times in returning. I watch the red signal lights along the tracks to tell me where the trains are heading.
Last Wednesday, we passed three tanker trains heading east in less than one-and-a-half hours–all rushing at their maximum speed as they passed through Stratton, Barwick, Manitou Rapids, and Emo.
It is an awesome sight to see Canada’s rolling pipeline in action.
Former Fort Frances Coun. Ken Perry advised me on Friday afternoon that in a period between January and April, 2018, 32 trains passed through Fort Frances and the district each day, with four coming or going east of Fort Frances and the balance moving through the port of Ranier, Mn. from the west.
Ken also told me CN is looking to boost the number of trains moving through Rainy River District to 50 per day in the near future.
With the expansion of Prince Rupert, B.C. to accept more cargo containers and direct shipment of those containers into the central U.S. Midwest, that will account for some of that growth. The rest will come as the number of tanker rail car trains will rise to move the growing glut of oil in western Canada to refineries and ports in the U.S.
Each train of 100 cars carries 75,000 barrels of oil.
People opposed to pipelines and fossil fuels are comfortable with the movement of oil by trains. Because trains have been around forever, they are considered safe and everyone has grown comfortable with their speedy movement through the centres of communities.
Yet it appears there are many derailments and oil spills on those routes.
Environmentalists worry about pipeline breaks and oil spills. But many train derailments take place in the U.S. and we hear very little about the amount of oil spillage into rivers and lakes.
Pipelines move around urban centres. Pipelines also are quiet compared to the squealing of steel wheels against steel tracks.
As well, pipelines are less likely to jar you awake in the middle of the night as trains brake or start up–jolting each car into movement.
Historically, the thousands of miles of pipelines across Canada and the United States have proven to be safer and more reliable. Yet the wisdom of our current national government has lacked the will to move pipelines forward to tidal waters in the interests of all Canadians.
If Macdonald and Laurier had the same backbone that today’s Liberal politicians do, the Canadian Pacific Railway would never have joined British Columbia to the rest of Canada, nor would a Trans-Canada Highway ever have been built connecting the Maritimes with all the provinces through to B.C.

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