Will another government fall to scandal?

Do we elect governments or toss out governments at the federal level?
Since the 1930s, governments have fallen on scandals that have included potential bribery, potential collusion with Russian spies, and misappropriations of federal sums.
I remember when the Fort Frances Times acquired its first offset press in the mid-1960s. It had come all the way from Heidelberg, Germany in a huge crate.
The guys in the back shop chuckled as they uncrated the press wondering if they would receive a bonus like the ones Conservative cabinet ministers in Ottawa had with a beautiful temptress named Gerda Munsinger. She was suspected of being a Russian spy and her affairs with two of Diefenbaker’s cabinet ministers ultimately led to the changing of the government.
Munsinger returned to West Germany with a cloud of suspicion hanging over her head.
The biggest financial scandal that rocked Ottawa came when the government of Sir John A. Macdonald received $350,000 from Sir Hugh Allen, whose company was the successful bidder to build the railway across Canada. The so-called Pacific scandal led to the defeat of the Conservatives.
Alexander Mackenzie’s government took over and the contract with Allen’s company was cancelled. The railway was stalled for four years.
In 1930, then-Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King received $700,00 in campaign financing allowing Beauharnois Light, Heat and Power Company to divert the St. Lawrence River to generate electrical power. The government was defeated and the Conservatives took power, although King was able to redeem himself in the next election.
Brian Mulroney was implicated in the Airbus scandal when his government moved to acquire 34 Airbus planes. He subsequently was cleared and won an award of $2.1 million from the Canadian government.
But it was enough to lead to the almost total wipeout of the Conservative party in the next election.
Jean Chrétien’s Liberal government was rocked by the sponsorship scandal. Following the close election that was about separating from Canada, the Chrétien government established a plan to tell Quebecers, through sponsorships and advertising, how valuable the Canadian government was to them.
Some $250 million was spent on the plan but then-Auditor General Sheila Fraser found that $100 million either was misspent or couldn’t be accounted for. Some of the funds appeared to have been directed to ad agencies with close ties to the Liberal Party in Quebec.
Paul Martin, succeeded Chrétien as prime minister, eked out a small minority government in 2004–only to be defeated in 2006 by Stephen Harper.
Today we appear to have a new scandal brewing. It appears that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau or his office may have intervened in a court proceeding affecting SNC-Lavalin. The prime minister appears to have contradicted himself several times in responding to questions surrounding the abrupt resignation of Jody Wilson-Raybould from the Veterans Affair portfolio.
Rumour has it that Ms. Wilson-Raybould was pressured not to pursue litigation against SNC-Lavalin’s bribery and fraud prosecution when she was the Attorney General of Canada. One wonders now why as a lawyer, she now needs a law firm to represent her and why the government does not wish to investigate the allegations?
It is federal election season. Is this another scandal that will cause a change in government?
What we know is that eventually all secrets come out–and some quicker when there either is a change in leadership or a change in government.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail