Week features lots of history

A report in the Falls Journal noted that Borderland already had received 14 more inches of snow this year than is normal—and that was without Saturday’s snowfall.
And we have a higher amount of snow still sitting on the ground than we normally do. As you read this, the official first day of spring is just over a week away.
But before we get there, there is lots of history in the coming week.
March 13, 1945 marks the date that Queen Wilhelmina returned to the Netherlands following the Second World War. It was on this date in 1925 that the State of Tennessee made it unlawful to teach evolution.
And one of the best financial deals ever occurred in 1677 when the settlement of Massachusetts gained title to Maine for the paltry sum of $6,000.
With tensions currently festering on the Korean peninsula, it is remembered that Seoul was captured on March 14, 1951 by the United Nations’ forces during the Korean War.
March 14 is also the official Pi Day, marking the famous mathematical number.
On March 15, we meet up with the “Ides of March,” which Shakespeare made famous with his line of Julius Caesar: “Beware the Ides of March”
It marked his death. The Roman leader was stabbed 23 times in the Roman Senate.
Other March 15 events have included the birth of a president and the start of a revolution.
No sooner have we finished up with the “Ides” when everyone becomes Irish to celebrate the Feast of St. Patrick on March 17. He is the patron saint of Ireland and throughout much of the western world, it is a time of parades, frolicking, drinking of beer, and eating corned beef with cabbage and enjoying a spud.
We all will celebrate the Irish culture by wearing some green or enjoying a pint. At one time in Fort Frances, the Emperor Hotel, the Prince Albert Hotel, and the Rainy Lake all would serve up green beer that day.
St. Patrick’s official colour was blue, but a drop of food colouring into the beer turned it a shamrock green.
Historically, the first human to walk in space took place on March 18, 1965. A Soviet cosmonaut named Lt. Col. Alexei Leonov went for short spin outside his Voskshod II spacecraft.
The Supreme Court, meanwhile, ruled on Friday that the Métis Nation that existed prior to the creation of Manitoba had been promised lands that currently make up the city of Winnipeg.
The Métis leader, Louis Riel, returned from exile in the United States on March 19, 1885 to Saskatchewan, where he proclaimed a provisional government.
On March 19, 1918, the U.S. Congress approved the time zones in the United States and also authorized Daylight Savings Times.
It would be great to dream that this week will mark the last snowfall of the year. But looking at history of snow in March, I doubt we will be that fortunate.
In the meantime, enjoy that extra hour of daylight in the evening.

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