We always worry about our kids

A mother’s job is never finished. Nor do parents ever stop worrying about their children.
Marnie and I have a tradition of calling our sons every Sunday night to hear their voices and those of their spouses. Both live more than 1,000 miles in opposite directions from Fort Frances.
One travels a great deal for his job, which takes him around the world. They often are long business trips. As parents, we know his departure and return dates, and pay close attention to airline schedules.
The other has a job that has he and his wife commuting on subway lines to and from work in Toronto. Both sons have interesting careers and both daughters-in-law bring joy to our hearts.
The sounds and emotions of their voices in the calls are welcomed. One couple, for instance, has had their condo on the market for more than 90 days and listening to their hopefulness of being able to sell their unit and begin the look for a new residence is exciting.
We also can hear the disappointment and emotion when a potential sale has fallen through.
My younger son and his wife, meanwhile, have begun the hunt for a home to call their own in Toronto. It is a tough market.
For the past year, they’ve been renting a condo with terrific access to the subway lines that can take them both to work. But the landlord is not going to renew the lease so they are exploring their options of renting versus buying.
A single bedroom condo or apartment now is renting at an average of $1,910 a month. Buying a condo, and paying the taxes and maintenance fees, almost is equivalent, although one can build equity by owning.
The numbers both boys are looking at astound me. Our first home was bought for $22,000 but that wouldn’t even cover the down payment on a one-bedroom condo in Toronto.
In fact, almost all homes in Fort Frances can be purchased with less money than a single bedroom condo in Toronto.
In Fort Frances, we are selling my mother’s home that is listed for about one-third of the value of a similar home in Calgary and a quarter of the value of a home listed in Toronto. I shake my head.
We worry over the obstacles our grown children face. The financing numbers my sons are considering flabbergast me. But I suppose that 40 years ago, the numbers my wife and I were looking to spend for a home seemed equally foolish to our parents.
They probably worried more about our being able to afford a home than we did.
I just hope it is the same for my children.

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