We all must fight pollution

I remember flying into Chicago when I was 16 years old with my father and as the plane began its decent into the airport, we passed through a greenish, yellow zone.
It was a visible air quality issue. The yellow cloud was easy to distinguish.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau went to Paris with the same greenhouse gas emission targets set by former PM Stephen Harper. The difference is that Trudeau is being hailed as a breath of fresh air in global warming.
Along with 149 other leaders, Trudeau is expected to help solve the crisis over global warming.
He has begun with a commitment by Canada to fund $2.65 billion over five years to help developing countries reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. The previous government had contributed $1.2 billion to that fund.
Yes, the world does face the issue of global warming. In 2013, one of China’s largest cities, Harbin, with a population of more than 11 million people, was shut down completely when the air pollution index exceeded 1,000 parts when a level of 300 parts is considered hazardous.
In China, air pollution can be seen. On average, it is estimated that 4000 people die daily as a result of it.
On Monday, the pollution smog index in Beijing was 611 and southwest of the city, it was registering 938.
The pollution is visible to the eye. The capital had to be shut down.
As a result, China has set its own clean air goals. Long dependent on coal-fired electric generating plants, China has set a target to have all of the plants shut down by 2030.
In the U.S., President Barack Obama is under political fire for trying to wean electrical grids from coal-generated power to be replaced by renewable energy sources and natural gas.
Premier Kathleen Wynne has shut down all the coal-fired plants in Ontario. In Atikokan and Thunder Bay, the two coal-fired hydro plants now generate power from wood pellets.
Canada has seen a reduction in carbon emissions.
In order to move forward, other measures will have to be taken. Agriculture across the world generates 30 percent of carbon emissions. Tilling soil encourages decomposition, as does composting, which emit carbon dioxide into the air.
Food waste from households, restaurants, and groceries—tossed into landfills—emit greenhouse gases.
Right across Canada, we still face the need to use oil-based products to fuel our cars to travel to and from work, deliver products from factories and farms to retailers, and to fly anywhere.
In many areas of Canada, oil still is used to heat homes where natural gas is not available.
To reduce our dependence on carbon energy, as a nation we will have to adapt to new methods of growing crops, reducing the energy needed to heat or cool homes and offices, increasing mileage for cars and transport vehicles, and expanding public transportation in our cities.
It is a challenge for every Canadian to take up.

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