Voicemail obsolete

When the Fort Frances Times initiated voicemail, we believed it was really important for a caller to speak to a real person when phoning the newspaper.
We still believe that, but we do have a voicemail system so that calls after hours, or when a person is away from their desk or on another call, the caller can leave a message.
When I sit down at my desk at the office, a flashing light tells me that I have voicemail. At home, I have no flashing light to tell me I have voicemail. Instead, I have to look squarely at the phone on the wall to see if a message is showing on the screen to notify me of it.
I’m not good at regularly checking my home phone for voicemail.
Just as the fax machine already has disappeared from most businesses, JP Morgan expects the next technology death will be voicemail. In that organization, 65 percent of JP Morgan employees chose to dismantle voicemail from their systems, which will save that company $3.2 million annually.
Coca-Cola in Atlanta dropped voicemail to increase productivity.
One of the more intriguing findings in surveys is that people become so frustrated with voicemail systems that they hang up in the process of trying to reach contacts. The only place where voicemail continues is in customer service and support.
Today, e-mails and texting are replacing voicemail. Millennials feel a text message is more personal than a voice one.
Millennials are the first to adopt dropping voicemail. Most cellphone plans come with an automatic system that records the sender or phone number of the caller.
The person receiving the call can choose to accept the call or disregard it. They even can remove the missed call from their phone.
I often suspect that my youngest son looks at the number on his phone and makes a decision on whether or not to answer if I’m calling. I get a far quicker response to a text message asking him to call.
Maybe the text implies a much more important call.
With multiple cellphones in every household, telephone companies with land lines selling caller ID, messaging, and a host of other add-ons now are discovering that consumers are dropping their land lines like they were hot potatoes.
Telephone companies, in analyzing their records, have discovered that home phone owners have stopped retrieving messages with an annual decline of 14 percent. Similar declines are found on cellphones.
One of the issues that millennials state in choosing not to leave a voicemail is that they feel uncomfortable and awkward speaking coherently into a message box. They often are so far out of practice speaking to someone that they need coaching.
Through texting or e-mailing, millennials can look over and review the message they are sending.
The workplace continues to change and us older “boomer” generation, who still enjoy the actual phone discussion, have to make way for the next generation of millennials who feel voice is too slow and too old-fashioned.
Yes, voicemail will end.

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