Trade barriers hike costs

How much are economic barriers between provinces affecting us.
If you want to buy a French wine at the LCBO here, there is little problem beyond ordering it in. However, try to get a Merlot out of British Columbia and the task becomes impossible.
Ontario would much rather import wines from Europe, California, or Australia before it would permit wines from B.C. to find their way onto the shelves of our liquor stores.
It makes no sense.
Ontario residents can bring back wine and spirits from other provinces but the quantities are restrictive.
Meanwhile, a doctor licensed in Manitoba would like to relocate to Fort Frances. But it becomes a daunting task with the College of Physicians insisting that the doctor begin the process of accreditation anew.
A district resident spoke to me last week about the differences involved in licensing an over-sized load to travel across the Prairie provinces and travelling in Northwestern Ontario. They are significant.
One might think we would have similar regulations for truck operations on our highways across Canada. Instead, we have a variety of regulations.
The cost to Canadians is enormous. It’s been estimated the trade barriers between provinces costs between $3 billion and $14 billion annually.
Marketing boards in Canada restrict the growth of milk and dairy products, as well as poultry. Some provinces have the lion’s share of the production while others that would like to grow their share are restricted by the national marketing boards.
This past week, Ontario and Quebec joined B.C. in setting criteria for oil pipelines to flow across those provinces. For a pipeline company, it means having to meet a variety of different rules and regulations.
It involves far more consultation in each province—and far more regulations.
Environmentalists might cheer those regulations and barriers, but it does little to create the jobs in steel mills, the construction industry, or work for the pipeline maintenance crews.
Pipeline companies eventually will attempt to meet the different requirements, but a national set of rules and expectations would save billions in costs.
Failing to develop the pipelines, the oil and gas industry will find alternate means of delivering oil to refineries across Canada.
Every time a province places additional barriers to protect its small niche markets, they hurt their citizens through higher costs.

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