Timeless messsage carries on

In this edition of the Fort Frances Times, we will publish the “Message of Glad Tidings” taken from the New Testament Book of Luke, Chapter 2 verses 8-11.
Published for the 80th time with this Christmas edition, it is a tradition that was begun by my grandfather and his partner in 1934, which was carried on through 20-some years when he was the publisher.
The selection taken from the Bible is a message of hope for everyone.
For my grandfather to make the decision to include this selection in the paper was part of his religious beliefs, and a reminder to everyone about the meaning and spirit of Christmas.
Later, then editor Carl Schubring deemed it important to annually re-publish the selection.
My father carried on the tradition. Today, we continue to print the same simple story and message as an editorial.
As our country keeps changing, and the diversity of people and religions continues to expand, it may not be politically correct to keep including the message. But I feel it is part of the heritage of the newspaper and fills much of the culture of Rainy River District.
Many families will find their way to churches on Christmas Eve while others will fill the pews on Christmas morning to sing of the excitement of Christ’s birth.
As the country changes, we have come to honour and recognize different religious practices and customs. As a diverse culture, we know that even within the Christian following, there are different customs, beliefs, and practices of the various denominations.
We know that we don’t even necessarily celebrate Christmas as the same time.
We learn from the people that we come in contact with throughout Canada and the world that we share many of the same common moral beliefs, whether we are Sikh, Muslim, Hindu, or Buddhist.
Political correctness has prompted organizations to drop the salutation of “Merry Christmas,” replacing it with “Happy Holidays.”
“Kwanzaa” has come into being to create a holiday celebration promoting a celebration of family, community, and culture. Created as an African-American holiday, it is an inclusive celebration bringing together people of all faiths.
Yet Christmas continues to be a time when we do wish one another good wishes and find time to say thank you, and take time to think of those less fortunate and try to make their lives better even for one single day.
We do have the western world economy slow for a day.
There may come a time when a different publisher will choose not to include “The Message of Glad Tidings,” but we will continue to do so into the future.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail