Time to think gardening

The garden seeds are in the stores. So, too, are the starter kits for flowers, tomatoes, and other plants that will be transplanted later this year.
The days are growing longer and there still is light after six p.m. In the mornings, I almost can see daylight now as I head to the office shortly before 7 a.m.
And this week, in fact, we are seeing melting temperatures.
Spring is arriving although winter keeps kicking and fighting to stick around.
We barbecued on Monday evening. We like to barbecue almost year-round, but the cold of this winter has made it less than perfect. Shivering in the cold to create a perfectly-cooked hamburger or grilled steak just doesn’t elicit excitement.
Later in spring, wearing only a sweatshirt, grilling burgers or salmon on the barbecue—and sipping on a glass of wine—is a much more pleasant experience.
I look at the calendar and notice that come Friday, only four more weeks of winter remain (officially). But with almost three feet of snow on the ground, it’s hard to imagine that yard work and clean-up could begin within seven weeks.
Looking yesterday at the piles of snow, it’s hard to imagine that it will disappear very quickly. But when warm weather strikes, the snow can disappear rapidly.
I am optimistic.
The arrival of seeds in stores is but a sign to me that spring is on the way. I am a poor gardener but trust that the nursery operators already have a plan in place to have bedding plants ready for me the weekend after the long weekend in May.
Last fall, I put three rods on a rack to be worked on over the course of the winter. All three have had eyes broken out of them and now are fraying the line. I had forgotten about them until I glanced at the rack on the wall on holiday Monday.
Open-water fishing season will occur quick enough, and it is time that I ordered up the replacement eyes and epoxy to make the necessary repairs.
In January, during the midst of all the unseasonably cold weather, the fishing and tackle catalogues arrived in my mailbox. They were shuffled to the pile to be gazed at later.
It is really hard to get excited by the anticipation of open-water fishing when your outdoor activities tell you that survival in the cold is most important.
But after seeing those three rods on the wall requiring repairs, I was seduced into looking at the catalogues that are sitting on a table beside my chair in the family room.
Sure enough, there are new rods and new reels to dream about. Manufacturers have new lures to add to my bulging tackle boxes should I really need them while the accessories that I can add to my boat have not diminished.
I felt like a kid at Christmas circling all the possible additions that I could make to increase my fishing success.
We all have our vices. For some it is gardening; others it is golf. In winter, my vice is woodworking while in summer it is fishing.
We all get to dream that spring and summer are almost here, and we will renew our passions.

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