Time to ‘spring forward’ again

There’s a story circulating for a couple of centuries now that the American inventor, Benjamin Franklin, started Daylight Saving Time back in 1784.
He had suggested to Parisians that by moving their clocks forward, they could save on candles.
It actually was a New Zealander, George Hudson, who came up with the novel idea. He was a laborer and an entomologist who liked to collect insects, which he did that after work.
He published a paper in 1895 proposing two hours of daylight shift. It was re-published several times.
But it took an English golfer, William Willett, to get the ball rolling on daylight saving. He published his own scientific paper, which was brought to the British House of Commons by Robert Pearce in 1908.
It didn’t pass then, but was studied and came into being during the First World War.
Today, golfers across Canada still enjoy the benefits of daylight saving time (DST). So do the walleye fishermen who hit the lakes after work and enjoy that late-evening bite.
True to the biggest benefit of daylight saving time is the number of extra evening leisure daylight hours that it provides. Most summer ball still happens under daylight. Going home after work and being able to enjoy the daylight evening hours with an evening stroll along the waterfront, or a Thursday evening motorcycle ride, is welcomed.
Since that first Sunday in November, we have lost that extra hour of daylight. But come Sunday, we again will gain an hour.
Daylight saving time begins in Canada this Sunday (March 12) at 2 a.m. Across the northwest, all communities except Atikokan will advance their clocks by one hour (the communities of Pickle Lake and New Osnaburgh, though located in the Central Time Zone, actually observe Eastern Standard Time year-round).
All provinces with the exception of Saskatchewan, which remains on Central Standard Time, participate in daylight savings. The city of Lloydminster, which straddles the Alberta-Saskatchewan boundary, observes Mountain Time year-round.
For parents of younger children, the change in hours presents new challenges. Sunday evening will begin that new schedule and children will be expected to be in bed an hour earlier.
This year, the spring forward day falls on March Break. So Monday morning, parents will face the new task of getting their children up at an hour earlier than they have been used to for four months.
For farmers who have that regular routine of feeding their livestock and milking their dairy herds, the hour change affects their schedule.
Many a Sunday worshipper have arrived an hour after services began on the first day of daylight saving time. It is an easy enough mistake to make.
Not all nations in the world observe DST. Even the states of Hawaii and Arizona do not follow DST.
As well, nations in the southern hemisphere observe DST opposite to what we do here in the northern hemisphere.

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