Support daffodil pin drive

It is the first flower of spring. It is Mother Nature’s symbol of hope.
The daffodil, with its brilliant yellow petals, has been sold every year in Fort Frances by the sororities as their way of supporting the Canadian Cancer Society.
In my household, I’ve been bringing those fresh daffodils home for more than 35 years. The local sorority would have a sign-up sheet for daffodils at the newspaper, and my sister would go around encouraging everyone on staff to buy at least one bunch.
Most at the newspaper bought more than the single bunch in support of the daffodil drive.
The sale of daffodils had been a partnership between the local sorority chapters and the Canadian Cancer Society for more than half-a-century. Up to this year, the women of the sororities had taken orders for bunches of daffodils, and delivered them to businesses and people across the district.
This year, however, the sale of daffodils has ceased—replaced by the sale of daffodil pins.
The daffodil drive began in 1956 when Toronto volunteers handed out daffodils to restaurants to give to their patrons spreading the message of cancer awareness.
When patrons volunteered to pay for the daffodils, it was realized that it was a great way to support the Canadian Cancer Society and its work.
The following year, volunteers raised $1,200 in Toronto and Daffodil Month was off to a growing start. That sale in 1957 in Toronto was adopted across Canada, and later in Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia.
Since that start in 1957, volunteers have raised millions of dollars. Cancer diagnosis has gone from an almost sure death sentence to cures and living normal lives in many cancers.
It wasn’t until the year 2000 that the Canadian Cancer Society adopted the daffodil as its logo a symbol of hope. That first flower of spring; sprout in the most humble places.
The flowers arrived in the Fort in tight buds but within a couple of days, they popped into the most brilliant flower.
Last year was the last time that the daffodils were sold in Fort Frances and the district. Pins that can be acquired from many businesses have replaced the daffodils.
The sorority is asking for people to make donations and wear the pin.
Much of the money that’s been raised through the daffodil sale program in the district has remained here helping families cope with the disease and raising the awareness of cancer through education programs.
Just because a bouquet of fresh daffodils does not arrive in your home, the drive remains just as important. That pin that you now can wear remains that symbol of hope.
The funds that were raised through the sale of daffodils are still needed.
Give generously when you pick up your pin. If last year you could afford $10 for two bunches of daffodils, you can afford to donate that same amount to the daffodil box when you put on your pin.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail