Something about wood smoke

There is something about the smell of wood smoke in the fall.
We arrived at the cabin Friday night and the temperature inside read barely 10 C. It was chilly and called immediately for a fire.
Stored in an old trunk was the kindling created by my brother-in-law this past summer. It didn’t take long for the fire to catch in the Woodsman stove, which only is lit just after ice-out in early spring or into the fall to heat the cabin.
We unpacked our groceries for the weekend, then I went to the wood pile and brought in an armful of birch and cedar. The grey smoke was curling upward and around the house, providing that wonderful, comforting aroma to the fall air.
The cabin heated. The kettle on the wood stove began to hiss and sputter and then went into a rolling boil, bringing the moisture in the air up.
Slowly, the floor, chairs, and walls began releasing their coolness.
Outside, the aroma from the woodstove fire circled around the cabin and down to the dock. There is something when you are outside in the evening and the smell from the wood smoke that drifts down that is reassuring.
Knowing the smoke is from somewhere close by gives you that feeling of warmth and comfort.
Travelling across the lake Saturday morning, every once in a while you would catch a hint of smoke. Your eyes would wander over to the shoreline to see who was at their cabin on the weekend.
There was not a lot of boat traffic on the lake Saturday. Few cars were at the marina and most of the boats were in their stalls. It was quiet.
Back in town, with the cooler evenings, I’ve caught the same wood-burning smells rising from the homes of residents in my neighbourhood. The fireplace fires will increase as the season cools and homeowners turn to wood heat to take some of the chill from family rooms.
Different woods put up different smells. Birch smoke, for instance, differs from pine, which differs from ash or poplar.
Some woods will hold heat while others can bring temperatures up.
Fall is wood fire time. It marks the change of seasons.

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