Season changes enjoyed

Weekly, my wife and I deliver the Fort Frances Times to our news dealers between Fort Frances and Rainy River. We call it our “date day” as we spend almost four hours with just ourselves without interruption.
One of the other benefits is watching the west end of the district move through the four seasons in slow motion.
By only travelling once a week on the highway, you can notice changes in the fields, trees, and communities.
We began almost a year ago, when most of the fields already were harvested, and one of our first surprises was the land clearing that was taking place creating fields just north of Barwick.
Trees had been windrowed in straight lines. Other fields already were being tilled in preparation for putting in the crop the following year.
The work on the culvert on the west side of Emo seemed to drag on forever while paving west of Barwick appeared to be moving much faster. The job was finished shortly after the frost came out of the ground this past spring.
Sometimes the highway was clear of snow. Other days, the road was snow-packed and the winds were strong. With heavy winds and driving snow, the trip often took much longer in winter.
The cold blue winter white hovered over the fields. Snow banks built up and as the days grew longer, those banks receded and the black fields started appearing again.
Deer came out of winter hiding and popped up along the roadway, picking out the freshest green grasses.
The fields received their final tilling and before we knew it, green sprouts began popping up and we wondered what crops were being grown.
Almost simultaneously, construction season was underway with culvert replacements just before Pinewood and at the Kitchen Creek Golf Course. Later, construction crews began the replacement of the culvert on the east side of Emo.
The test crops at the Emo Agricultural Research Station were planted and each week we watched as the corn grew in centimetres, then in 10s of centimetres, before it finally stopped growing being almost two metres tall.
Canola bloomed bright fluorescent yellow. The heads of barley, wheat, and oats sprouted, and in late July turned to gold and the grains dried.
In the meantime, the fields that were planted with soybeans continued to grown and one wondered if the pods actually were forming. Soybeans had been one of the first crops planted.
More fields were receiving tile drainage. One could see the GPS patterns left in fields by the tile digger plows. A week later passing those same fields, the owners already had turned the fields over and were getting them ready for seeding next year.
Last Wednesday, two combines were lifting the soybean crops in Amos Brielmann’s fields. It is the last crop to be harvested that was among the first planted in the spring.
The leaves are turning and falling. The bulrushes in the ditches have turned from green to brown and the cattails are exploding. Fields again are being disked and harrowed.
The expansion of grain crops continues and the farmers never seem to take a break.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail