Restoring cars a work of love

Have you ever been asked the question: “Do you have a hobby?”
It is an easy question as most of us probably do have such a hobby. I know that I do. So do my wife, my brother and my sister, and many of the employees here at the Times.
Often, the hobby bears no relationship to the job they do during the day.
This week, two different groups will be displaying the rewards of their hobbies. In one case, bass anglers will demonstrate their catching skills honed by countless hours spent practising on waters across the area.
And with the “Canadian Coasters” rolling into town this week, displaying the spit and polish of their favourite past vehicles, one will be able to enjoy the nostalgia of the painstakingly restored cars and trucks.
More than 100 vehicles are part of the “Canadian Coasters” trek across Canada. Other car enthusiasts from the communities they pass through frequently join the owners of these beautiful vehicles.
In fact, organizers are expecting that many of the members of the local International Early Iron Club also will be showcasing their cars on Scott Street today and again tomorrow down by the Sorting Gap Marina.
In addition, other classic cars are expected to arrive from Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin.
One of my hobbies is woodworking. You might start with rough-cut, kiln-dried wood and then you begin to transform it. You start by planing the wood to a certain thickness and then putting it through a jointer to get a perfectly square edge.
After that, the second edge can be ripped with a table saw and the board finally is ready to be used. Shaping, drilling, and connecting are the next steps and once assembled, the finishing begins.
The finishing often takes longer than all the steps leading up to it.
I think the story is the same for those classic car hobbyists. Some believe they have to restore their cars to the original specifications while others choose to update their cars with modern stereos, air conditioning, and even newer engines.
It is all a work of love.
Some body parts can be found online. Others are removed from cars in junk yards, then cleaned, sanded, primed, and painted. Still other parts have to be manufactured from scratch to look like original equipment.
The final paint is added and often with a clear coat on top.
These marvelous cars usually are stored under wraps to protect their skins before venturing on occasion for special trips with their owners. The vehicles have been transformed into works of art.
And when the owners gather, they talk of the care that went into restoring their vehicles, exchanging information about where parts can be found. It is a social activity and all like to share their passion with each other.
They’ll gather around chrome bumpers that the sun shining on almost can blind you.
The gathering becomes a social event, with car restorers being able to share their passion with the general public.

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