Reduce barriers

How difficult is it to do business across Canada?
If you are a corporation doing business across the country, you are faced with a variety of barriers with regards to provincial taxes, different provincial regulations regarding employment standards, different regulations regarding employment qualifications, and even problems moving parts between provinces for assembly.
Yet those same barriers with regard to manufactured goods or agricultural products are eliminated with 47 nations which Canada does business.
Statistics show 40 percent of all trade takes place within Canada. However, protectionism by 10 different provinces and three territories makes internal Canadian trade difficult.
The barriers to free trade across Canada probably are costing Canadians $50 billion a year in lost business and jobs.
In drafting the Canadian Constitution in 1867, Canada’s statesmen moved to establish an open, accessible internal market; and the completion of the railway from the Atlantic to the Pacific was to make internal trade easier.
Just because it was planned, though, Canada’s first provinces already were erecting barriers and travellers moving from Upper or Lower Canada had their wares inspected and taxed at the Atlantic provinces.
The provinces within their boundaries can regulate the starting and running of businesses, obtaining professional accreditation, and ensuring consumer safety.
Rules restrict the shipping of wine across the country. Different rules make completing apprenticeship programs almost impossible without staying in the province where you began it.
Provincially-inspected foods are not allowed to cross borders. It is a barrier to small food producers who are limited to selling their product in the province of origin.
The local abattoir cannot ship meat products to Manitoba or Quebec.
One would think that with the European trade agreement being finalized, as well as progress being made on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Canadian government would be promoting a Canada-wide free trade agreement.
All the major parties support trade agreements between nations that open up markets and job opportunities for Canadians, but seem to be hesitant to support similar programs across our own country.
Provincial barriers and protectionism are stifling Canadians. Provincial premiers seem reluctant to open up their regulations to create a single set of national regulations and standards across our nation.
Provinces continue to create new barriers and the developers are discovering with the west-east pipeline to move western oil to refineries in Quebec and New Brunswick that both Ontario and Quebec have put in place different criteria to permit the construction of the pipeline in their provinces.
During this election, not a word has been said that would eliminate internal trade and work barriers in Canada. The leaders and even the local candidates have been silent on the issue.
They really don’t wish to offend their provincial counterparts.
Opening up markets across Canada, and permitting freer movement of people to move between provinces for work, would stimulate the Canadian economy.

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