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I am trying to figure out what my new normal routine is. Retirement came and I very much continued my old schedule dropping into the newspaper almost daily. I would write this column over the weekend and then put it into the que Monday sometime from the desk that was still mine. I had meetings scheduled almost once per week all at noon hours and looked forward to the social interaction with different people from across the district and the province.
That has all changed. I am trying to create a new normal.
My wife and I walk to get our 6000 steps in every day. The day I wrote this, we met a total of seven people out for their walk often with a dog on a leash. The day before we said good morning to five people over the 5.5 km route that we take. When we meet another walker or pass a walker, we are maintaining the appropriate two-meter separation. The exercise is helping my health. As Canadians we are doing a great job of social isolating.
The nurses at Valley Diabetes and my physician have constantly harped on my need for more exercise to reduce my blood sugar levels. I regularly scooted around the issue with them and compensated by increasing my insulin levels. Devoting more time to exercise has reduced my need for as much daily insulin and my blood glucose levels have dropped considerably. I hope that I can maintain and improve this new normal.
My neighbor told me over the fence that she missed out on her two year old grand-daughter’s birthday on Sunday. My brother and his wife celebrated their youngest grandson’s birthday through “Facetime”. It just isn’t like being there. Lots of family celebrations are being missed out on.
I miss the socializing that went before. I miss the interaction of stopping to chat with people as I work in my yard. Few are out walking these days staying cooped up in their homes following the provincial health authority rules. I don’t believe that working in my yard violates the rules. I miss stopping into various stores and exchanging greetings with business owners who I have done business with for over 50 years.
I miss the “Ten ‘n Three” coffee group where we discussed the news of the community, province, country and world and often disagreed on the accuracy of someone’s statements. I miss the verbal humorous jabs and counter punches delivered with great glee between us.
I have reached a point of being almost afraid to turn on the news or read national papers. Each day brings more bitter news. When I have read through papers of the newspaper of the Second World War, today seems remarkably similar. For almost four years, each edition brought sadness and worry to the district, as parents learned of the loss or wounding of sons and husbands. Each edition worked to find something positive to say.
On Sunday Queen Elizabeth in her address to the United Kingdom referenced back to a time of the Second World War when she and her sister Princess Margaret told youngsters who were being moved from London to live with families in safer parts of the country that “they would meet again” with their parents. In 1943 Vera Lynn created a hit “We’ll meet Again.” The song goes on “I don’t know where or when.” In referencing back in time, the Queen reinforced the hope and belief that once again, many of the things that we did before, we’ll be able to do again.

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