More electricity will be required

Canada produces 1.6 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases.
Leading the pack on per capita producers is Saudi Arabia followed by Australia, the United States, and then Canada. It makes us a target to do better.
Countries like Russia, China, India, the European Union, United States and Germany produce far more a of green house gases than Canada.
Truly, the only clean environmental fuel is electricity.
Oil-fired or coal-fired electrical generating stations are being phased out.
In their place are natural gas-fired electrical generating stations and bio-fuel generating stations.
They, too, generate carbon emissions.
Some research indicates that bio-mass electrical generating stations produce as much CO2 emissions as do coal-fired power plants.
In measuring clean energy, biomass plants are considered renewal energy since fibre can be grown absorbing CO2 and are not counted in a country’s green house gas emissions.
Similarly, more greenhouse gases are produced in turning sugar cane, corn, barley and other grains into ethanol than using oil from the ground. Just as we do not consider biomass producers of green house gases, the world does not consider the production of bio-fuels in calculating greenhouse gas emissions.
One way or another, Canada will reduce its per capita green house gas emissions.
The premiers and territorial leaders met Monday to address a great number of concerns. On the top of their agenda was the federal carbon tax and turning to green energy.
Green energy will be the energy of the future and the present consensus is that we will turn more and more to electrical energy.
As automotive companies move to electrical vehicle production and continue to increase the mileage between recharging, more electricity will be required across Canada.
Three provincial premiers–Scott Moe from Saskatchewan, Doug Ford from Ontario, and New Brunswick premier Blaine Higgs–announced Sunday night that they had entered into an agreement on technology for small, modular nuclear reactors and were looking to deploy them across Canada.
We are coming full circle from a fear of nuclear energy to again adopting new technology to provide power across Canada filling the vacancy of power between what we can generate from hydro power and what we require to heat our homes, fuel our transportation, and power our factories.
These new modular reactors are being designed and built in Canada and the premiers hope to roll them out across Canada within the next six years.
In Fort Frances and the district, new home builders will again be considering whether to heat with hydro or with natural gas just as they made a decision to choose oil over coal and then flip a coin from oil to electric heat.
And when natural gas became available, town residents moved from oil or electrical heat to natural gas furnaces.
We will still draw oil from the ground to make the hundreds of thousands of products that we rely on in our daily lives.
But the biggest change we will face will be in the type of vehicle that we drive and how we heat our homes.

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