Many ways to fight cancer

April is Cancer Awareness Month.
The Beta Sigma Phi sorority recently sold daffodils here for the last time. Shortly, daffodil pins will go on sale throughout the community for those to make donations to the Canadian Cancer Society.
The money is well used assisting in research and helping cancer patients.
When the sign-up sheet was posted here at the Times to buy the daffodils, I didn’t hesitate. It was an insignificant amount of money that might make a difference.
Last year when the Riverside Foundation for Health Care was out campaigning for funding for a new digital mammography machine at La Verendrye Hospital, my family donated to the cause, as we had done for the CT Scanner.
Both are helping to make life better for families in the district.
Almost every month of the year has a focus on a different cancer. Every cancer has its own coloured ribbon. Each deserves the same recognition and awareness.
There probably is no family in the district that hasn’t been touched by cancer in some form. My father died from cancer, as did his sister. My father’s mother died of cancer.
At one time, the ‘c’ word was equivalent to a death sentence. Today, there is lots of good news about cancer and surviving. The five-year survival rates for both men and women have increased for 13 of the most common cancers.
It is a good story that bears re-telling. It is a good story in that those gains in survival have come through research and improved treatment. Survival has increased through earlier detection.
And through support for the Canadian Cancer Society by buying daffodils, or the “Relay for Life” or “Run for the Cure” or “Movember,” we get to step forward to help future patients survive their cancers.
Last week in the Times, Heather Latter wrote the story of the “Snow White and the Survivors” team, which has set a goal of raising $10,000 for the “Relay for Life” that will take place on June 21.
One gnome began its travels at the Times’ office and the other at Gillons’ Insurance. At both businesses, the staffs stepped up and donated far more than the minimum to move the gnomes along.
Other teams also will form for the “Relay for Life”—and each has a personal connection to cancer. As they walk around the track at Fort High, they will reminisce about loved ones or those currently undergoing treatment.
Tears will be shed. Laughter will erupt as funny stories are told. It will happen in Rainy River, Fort Frances, and wherever the “Relay for Life” takes place in Canada.
And participants, either supporting teams or being on one, all will feel a little better for helping.
Volunteers also will raise money in the “Run for the Cure” and men will raise money by forgetting to shave come November. Each will be contributing to more successful outcomes.

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