June a feast for the senses

June is a fun month. The leaves are all out and the pollen is falling from the pine trees, fertilizing the flowers that will, in a couple of months, produce cones for the squirrels to feed on.
All the annual flowers have been planted and their blooms brighten our neighbourhoods.
The cloying pungent smells of the lilacs are giving way to the soft fragrant smells of roses. Purple and yellow Irises bloom.
At the local farmers’ market, you can buy fresh morning-picked lettuce and tiny beets attached to brilliant red-green leaves. The first onions and baby potatoes also are available, along with kale and locally-grown strawberries.
The first peas of the season now are making their appearance at the market.
The smell of fresh-cut grass is constant throughout the week as everyone takes turn mowing his or her lawns on different days. The blueberry plants have finished flowering and the first berries are beginning to take shape.
With heat and moisture, we can expect a good crop to scatter over cereal in the morning, or in pancakes, muffins, pies, and loaves.
The days keep growing longer and you can sit outside on your patios into the late evening before the last shadows of daylight drift away into the night. This year, even the bugs and mosquitoes have held back their appearance.
The lake has warmed to make swimming, skiing, and boarding comfortable. Canoes, paddleboards, and peddle boats dot the beaches and docks around the lake.
The laughter and shrill cries of youths jumping into the waters of the lake bring smiles to your face. Youth seem immune to the temperatures of the water and can spend endless time in and out of the lake.
It is the sound of their care-free happiness that lets you know the summer vacation season again is upon us. Friends who departed at the start of the school season last fall are returning.
You catch up on their families and their adventures in travel, and their children and their children’s children. It is exciting and rewarding.
Thunderstorms wash the air and produce ozone molecules that make it smell fresh and clean. Following a long, sustaining downpour, the earthy smells of the soil rise up.
In early June, we picked morels and false morels. They have become a tradition with our family—something that we anticipate yearly.
The squirrels have been quiet around the cabin but a couple of red ones seem overly pregnant in May and we can expect to see offspring shortly. Fawns also are being spotted with their mothers.
The crows and eagles, meanwhile, are on the constant search for food for their young chicks.
The sights, sounds, and smells all make June fun.

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