Is Bill C-51 really necessary?

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has sharpened his spear in preparation for the coming fall election.
He is working hard to convince the Canadian electorate that terrorists are lurking behind every tree and telephone pole in the country. He is worried that citizens in rural Canada live in fear and they need firearms (long guns) to protect themselves.
I might agree with that when a bear comes knocking at the back door of my cottage, or a pack of wolves are lying in wait of newborn calves in the field. A long gun is rather handy to dispatch those critters.
Following the shootings on Parliament Hill and the attack of two soldiers near Montreal back in October, Harper appears to have worked up a fever of fear that more terrorists abound in Canada.
On Friday, a jury in Toronto found Raed Jaser and Chiheb Esseghaler guilty of a terror-related conspiracy to commit murder.
Should I feel less safe living in Canada today than I did a year ago?
The answer to protect Canadians is Bill C-51, which will allow ministries of the Crown to share information. This bill, according to the government, “will encourage and facilitate information-sharing between Government of Canada institutions in order to protect Canada against activities that undermine the security of Canada.”
Current legislation already appears to be working by the successful conviction of more than one terrorist.
We already know that “Big Brother” is listening in on all of our phone calls (must be mind-numbing).
We really can expect that with all the cookies that float around in space and land on our computers, that “Big Brother” has retrieved all of our e-mails, as well as notes all the paths we take to web pages, all of the items we buy online, and all of the transactions we make through our credit cards.
As Canadians, we have permitted the government to remove more and more of our freedoms and become more intrusive in our lives. Now Bill C-51 is asking Canadians to potentially sacrifice more of our freedoms in favour of protection.
Bill C-51 lacks supervision—no independent body has supervision over its use. No one will be looking over the shoulder of CSIS, or other agencies that are using it to spy on us.
Potentially-peaceful groups protesting issues could be targeted. Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien, in a brief, noted “the legislation could give as many as 17 federal departments and agencies access to every bit of data, personal and otherwise, that any department may hold on Canadians.”
One asks, “If I am not a terrorist, why should I be worried about the government spying on me and sharing information between departments?”
One of the fundamental responsibilities of government is to protect its peoples. However, is this new legislation necessary?

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail