Indoor washroom long time coming

We have grown older. Our children have married beautiful women who do not appreciate the rustic cabin life, and now we are creating an indoor washroom at the cottage.
It probably has been long-imagined and began when my father purchased a Sun-Mar composting toilet in the early 1990s which he was going to install.
The toilet has been stored in original boxes under the cabin for almost 25 years. It will be used next year when the indoor facility is completed.
Under our current sink is a small five gallon electric water heater. It hardly provides enough water to do the dishes and we are regularly boiling extra water to finish the dishes.
That heater will be replaced with a 184 litre electric hot water tank. That hot water tank will also provide the hot water for the shower and sink vanity in the new bathroom.
Since this new bathroom will be used in the shoulder seasons around summer, it was necessary to install an electric room heating system.
The vanity, mirrors and storage cupboards are still coming. The wiring is almost complete.
The shower is finally being installed. The majority of the water lines have been run.
The ceiling and two walls have been paneled in with Knotty Pine paneling from Manitou Lumber.
We will use ash hardwood flooring that was used in the main cabin. It was left over from an earlier project. That wood also came from Manitou.
Perhaps by cabin close up the interior of the new bathroom will be completed. The final plumbing will be completed in 2016, connecting the water lines and grey water lines.
This project started out as a low-cost upgrade.
When we researched showers, we learned that some inexpensive corner stalls could not withstand cold harsh northwestern Ontario winters when the bathrooms were left unheated. We are installing a fibreglass shower.
Some tools were required and they were purchased. My wife shakes her head at the tools that I have acquired for the project.
My old compressor tank cracked and failed. My brother-in-law brought his compressor to the camp to finish construction.
On Saturday, we discovered that the release nipple on the tank has gone missing since we had last used it.
Our neighbor at the lake had a compressor and we modified that compressor with fittings salvaged from our broken machines so that we could attach our hoses and use our air tools.
The air compressor has proved a valuable tool in construction at the lake.
The bills keep growing and this inexpensive addition bathroom project has almost doubled in price from the original plan.
By the time that the bathroom vanity and storage closets have been installed, and the final bills added together, the project will have we will have more than doubled our estimates.
But come 2016, it may be really enjoyable not to head up the outdoor biffy or use the outdoor shower.
By then, we will have forgotten our sore backs, our bruised heads and aching joints and the bills will all have been paid.

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