Hope lion turns to lamb

I believe the whole country is talking about the cold and length of this winter.
In fact, I would suggest that most of North America has experienced more cold this year than in the previous 35.
Historically, one of the coldest days recorded across Ontario happened on March 3, 2003, when temperatures across the province dropped into the minus-25 to minus-30 C range.
It may have been broken this past weekend.
Looking at our coldest temperatures, I discovered that on Jan. 24, 1990, we had a day where the temperature dropped to minus-43 C. And on Feb. 22, 1998, we had a day where we suffered through a similar day reaching minus-43.
As I look at records, our coldest day recorded for the month of March happened on March 31, 1973, when the temperature dropped to minus-39 C. Monday’s early-morning temperature registered at minus-37 C—setting a new cold record for that day.
Looking around the area, the average temperature in Kenora for December, January, and February was minus-18 C. It isn’t the coldest year ever recorded.
The International Falls Journal noted the Falls recorded more than 70 days from December through to March with temperatures hitting minus-18 C. It is not the coldest stretch in history, but comes close to nudging the average cold temperature that was recorded back in 1978.
We are not alone in wondering when someone will close the door on the freezer and let us warm up. From Calgary to Quebec City, Canadians all are looking out their windows wondering if their car will start and whether school buses will be running to get their children to school safely.
Towns and cities are discovering that even deeply-buried watermains and household water lines are not impervious to this year’s cold spell. Frost has been discovered as deep as two metres, and anyone who has had a record of having frozen water lines is encouraged to let a tap run continuously.
I commend the town crews who are working to thaw lines in the harshest weather and who are braving the cold to repair water and sewer mains. Facing outside harsh weather conditions for the past three months to restore water and sewer service to homes and businesses speaks highly of the crews’ dedication to the residents of our community.
It may seem like we have a great deal of snow on the ground, but in fact our totals this winter are on average for the year.
The piles seem unusually high for this time of year because we have not experienced the normal January and February thaws that eat them up.
With more daylight occurring daily, and with the change to daylight savings time this Sunday, we all can hope the lion of March quickly will turn to the lamb—and we finally can shed our heavy boots and warm overcoats and relish the coming of spring.

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