Fishing can be addictive

When fishing, my friend, Phil Bangert, often reminds those in the boat with him that if you try fishing, it could catch on.
He even goes so far as to tell you it could become habit forming to the point of being addictive.
Phil introduced me to bass fishing and has a million stories to keep you in stitches for a week of fishing.
Phil just purchased his latest Bass Cat bass boat and says that, at age 77, it will be his last boat that he will buy. He said the same thing a year ago.
He will return this weekend and begin practicing for the Fort FRances Canadian Bass Championship in which he will partner with his son, David.
He was at the lake just over two weeks ago, and on the run back to the landing, he sped the boat up to 69 m.p.h. and the speedometer would have risen higher except that he was running out of space approaching the landing.
With the wind whistling past your ears, your cheeks and loose skin pulling back your face is transformed back to a much younger you.
But he is right about fishing catching on and it becoming habit-forming. I had been in fishing withdrawal for seven weeks as a result of my infection, but this past July 4th weekend, my wife and I went out on several times over the weekend.
We hoped to catch some fish, but that was the least important part of it.
Just being out on the lake and enjoying the wildlife and islands began making up for the lost time.
The lake has warmed to a nice temperature—the low 20s C.
We tried some new humps looking for walleye on Friday night and came away with bruised egos, unable to entice anything to bite. Our fish finders failed to even register a single fish on the bottom.
On Saturday morning, we decided that we wouldn’t even target a specific species.
It was slow to begin with, and then at mid-morning, the action was furious only to slow to nothing at midday. It is the way of fishing.
I hooked a big northern during that furious fishing. Many may turn their noses at catching a northern but it was exciting.
I would reel it into the boat and as soon as it saw the boat, it would peel line furiously and dive underneath.
On another occasion it turned and headed for shore diving toward the bottom. It made three great runs and I was content to let it tire itself out when it made a fourth run and I suspect it cut the line on its sharp gill plate. It will be a fish long remembered for its fight and stamina.
On Sunday, we tried fishing for walleye again and although we could graph fish on the humps, we were unable to entice anything to bite.
Such is fishing.
We had lathered our faces, arms and legs with sunscreen. A light wind blowing from the east on Sunday and the haze over the lake made the fishing perfect.
It was also the perfect recipe for a deep red sunburn.
Phil is right.
Being on the lake, fishing, and enjoying the day really is habit forming.
We have a date for this Saturday.

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