First cabin trip enjoyed

Rainy Lake’s ice finished sinking to the bottom over the weekend and the first boats started filling marinas.
Everyone seems to be rushing to get their boats on the water.
I wasn’t the first to put my boat in this year. The blue water beckoned and Badiuk’s had my boat all serviced, the batteries charged and the pumps in working order, so it only was a matter of picking the boat up and launching it off the ramp.
It is one thing for me to drive forward pulling a boat, but backing up is a whole different matter. Someone who tried to teach me to back up referred to my skill as a person trying to walk a straight line and being very dizzy.
I’m constantly turning the wrong direction and even the advice of backing up slowly often has failed me. Watching from behind, it looked like a snake movement.
This year, it only took three tries to get the boat down the ramp. Luckily, there was no one else around to see my artistic backing manoeuvres.
The easy part was getting into the boat and letting it slide off the rollers into the water. Before I left Badiuk’s, I was reminded to put the baling plug in. Rather than waiting to get to the landing, I chose to install it right there.
I did, however, forget to close the live well drain, so the live well filled with water.
At the marina on Saturday morning, the owners of the houseboats were scraping, welding, sanding, and painting the hulls to get them launched as quickly as possible.
Arriving at the cabin, everything looked normal. I guess the last snowfall caused a large white pine branch to snap off. Fortunately, Rainy Lake is high enough that I could park at the dock.
As with all first trips to the cabin, there was a lot to do. The cabin was cool and so we lit a fire in the wood stove. Because the water is not hooked up yet, buckets of water were carried up from the dock.
We have a deadline to complete our new indoor washroom with hot and cold running water, a flush composting toilet, vanity, mirror, and new water system for the cabin. Much of the old water system has to be replaced and reconnected.
The first task was creating a cement pad for a hot water tank to sit on. I figured out the form and began nailing it together. Everything was moving smoothly as the first two boards were put together.
I started on the third, holding the nail to the board with my left thumb and finger. With my right hand, I swung the hammer down—cleanly missing the box nail.
My thumb was pinched and the nerves were angry. Glancing down, I expected to see a blood blister forming but one wasn’t. I felt I had dodged the bullet, but by mid-afternoon the blister was there.
Working under the cabin, on a slight incline, one loses focus on where the trusses run. My head has numerous scars from banging it on the beams and even a few cuts.
Between getting the boat in, the water system working, cleaning the deadfall, and filling the hot tub with Rainy Lake water, four of us filled a day-and-half activity, but enjoyed the sunset with a fire Saturday night.
Without mosquitoes and other bugs, the day ended perfectly.

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