Everything happens for a reason

Sometimes “things happen” as my good friend Phil Bangert would say.
This past weekend was like that and it became a bit of a trial.
We were heading to the lake. We were even leaving early to try and avoid the lineup moving over the overpass. We were on schedule.
We arrived at the boat landing, removed the top from the boat and loaded the supplies and groceries for the weekend.
We turned the key. Not even a click was heard. A new battery was needed and a quick trip back to the Fort was needed to acquire a starting battery.
The lineup back over the overpass now was around the corner on Scott Street and even though the traffic moved forward every four minutes, it took over 20 minutes to begin passing through Couchiching. The stress was building.
Much to our surprise the round trip lasted just over an hour. We figured we had made good time.
The new battery was installed. The motor started and instead of being at the cabin shortly after four we now arrived just before six.
We enjoyed a terrific sunset and began reading books.
Cabin life is for relaxing and removing stress.
Summer time and cabin life also is also reading time and already I have completed two books.
I tried a new hook setup that Jeff Gustafson had suggested in his column and–miracle of miracles–I caught my first walleye in the bay. It would prove to be the only walleye or fish caught this past weekend.
Saturday dawned, bright with a clear sky and a sharp northwest wind. My wife and I set out to fish some spaces that normally produce fish this time of year.
Watching the graph, I should have realized that the fish were not moving far from the spawning grounds and spent more time in those locations.
We were moving from one spot to another and my wife wanted to see a structure on the lake.
We had the GPS on and were following it closely in case one of the deposited glacial rock piles was hidden under the water.
A large bang was heard, the motor rose out of the water and it felt like going over a speed bump. We had hit something submerged.
Nothing was showing on the GPS, but the skeg of the motor was broken.
Any idea of fishing was now eliminated. Stress built.
Could we get back to the cabin?
We limped back. It was the first time in all my boating life on Rainy Lake that I have struck something submerged.
We chose not to move much farther but enjoy the balance of Saturday. We visited with new friends on Noden Island.
Cabins are for relaxing and slowing down. My wife and I read.
She worked on hemming some quilts she was making to donate to the store at the hospital.
I rigged rods and practised my casting. Nothing reacted to the lures that were presented.
Sunday, we slept in, had a leisurely breakfast and did nothing.
Things happen for a reason. In this case, maybe just totally slowing down and forcing us to relax was the reason.

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