Enjoying the simple pleasures

Sometimes you don’t realize how fortunate you are until someone shows you.
As I sat by our chimera on Sunday evening and the logs burned to red-hot coals, I had forgotten the pleasure a fire can bring in the waning daylight hours.
For those gathered around the fire, our next step was to slowly roast marshmallows and then squeeze them between two graham wafer crackers with a piece of milk chocolate wedged under the marshmallow.
“S’mores” are the perfect campfire snack. And one is never enough.
Cooking the perfect marshmallow is an art. Slowly turning the marshmallow until it is a swollen golden molten mass is tricky. Even resting too long on a side over the coals will see the marshmallow burst into flame and then be blackened.
Then your “S’more” tastes like carbon.
My future daughter-in-law, who is from South Korea, really enjoyed making those tasty evening desserts.
Earlier in the day, she had let it be known that she was determined to catch more fish on Rainy Lake than last year, when she only caught a single walleye.
This year, on the first outing, she managed to bring two under-sized walleyes into the boat. The trip was successful.
On Sunday, she wanted to catch bigger fish so we planned a trip to northern pike waters. Meesun had never cast a lure, so early in the morning I was teaching her to cast a lure from our dock into the bay.
I used the same technique that “In-Fisherman” has in its program. Bring the rod back to 2 o’clock and then forward to 10 o’clock and release the line.
As she became more confident, the lure went from just about in front of her to out into the bay. And then she was startled when a small northern took the lure and tried to run away with it.
She now had caught her third fish.
Later in the morning, she added a bigger northern to the livewell, which we brought back for photographs.
My future daughter-in-law likes to fish. She also has great enjoyment of our rustic cabin, where the silence of the lake is only unbroken by the sound of seagulls and crows, and the occasional bald eagle that circles the island looking for hand-outs.
Rainy Lake, meanwhile, has cooled down from its mid-July temperatures.
A quick dip in the waters to bath is a brisk reminder to hurry up and exit. In my younger years, the mid-60s temperatures would never have deterred us from swimming.
In my older years, I now find those same temperatures can take my breath away and make me feel alive.

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