Enjoy our fall season

I was a fishing guide on Rainy Lake this past weekend when my brother-in-law, Tom, and his two sons, Kyle and Ben, made their annual pilgrimage to our cabin.
They hail from Waterloo and Tom also has a cottage on Healy Lake, just south of Parry Sound.
There are fish in Healy, but nothing to match the variety and quality of the fishery of Rainy. And Rainy Lake did not disappoint them again this year.
For the first two days, we committed to the south end of the lake in the immediate vicinity of our cabin. And each day, everyone caught lots of northern, bass, and even a perch.
There was not a walleye to be found in the shallow waters we were fishing—and we understood that. Then on Saturday, we travelled north to Rebecca Island and fished deep humps around there targeting walleye.
The perch, however, targeted us and we all were amazed by the size of those orange fish. We ended up keeping 15.
My future daughter-in-law wondered why they would travel so far to go fishing. She is from Korea and is learning all about Canada.
It was easy to explain that the quality of fishing in Northwestern Ontario is world-renowned. It is why fishermen from across the United States pass through Fort Frances to fish Rainy Lake, Lake of the Woods, Eagle Lake, Red Lake, and many of the lakes in between.
The fishing is consistent. And the memories of being in a remote part of the lake, and catching a trophy fish to remember, almost can be guaranteed.
Our guests took lots of photographs holding their trophies. And fall fishing can guarantee some trophies.
Earlier in the week, I had been talking with Shelly Gustafson of the Great Bear. Although the number of fishermen stopping at their store was down, she noted that the older grandparent travellers were dropping in.
It is the same every year. The retired couples find the month of September the perfect travelling time to cross Canada. The leaves are turning their myriad of colours; the huge numbers of tourists are now busy back to work and getting their children off to school.
They are a travelling group we often forget about.
As I was growing up, my father always insisted we take a full day to motor to Sioux Narrows in late September to just enjoy the colours. The Maritimes and Central Ontario always promote their fall colours and finding hotel rooms often is a problem.
There even are forecasters who promote the best times to view the colours across the northern U.S. states.
Our fall colour season is shorter, but the forests are as beautiful as ever. On Rainy, the birch leaves already were yellow while the occasional paintbrush of red would stand out on the shore against the birch leaves.
Water, fishing, and fall colours make for an exciting combination on our lakes.
Take the time to enjoy what so many people travel to our region for every year.

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