Election for president appears over

My wife and I were in Washington, D.C. for the past several days.
In the U.S. capital, you might expect the hotbed of politics to be alive with lawn signs and television commercials promoting presidential and congressional candidates.
You would be wrong.
On Monday afternoon, we visited the “Nuseum” that focuses on news production from the earliest of times.
Located next to the Canadian Embassy, it features a gallery outside of all the front pages of publications that were printed on Monday.
Of the more than 60 titles, fewer than one-third had any information about the presidential races, or those for the House of Representatives or Senate.
It was as if an election was not taking place across the nation. The Globe and Mail here in Canada, meanwhile, carried a story on its front page.
Our taxi driver, who had immigrated to the U.S. 14 years ago from Ethiopia, was not impressed by the quality of the presidential candidates. He felt you should be choosing from two proven responsible candidates.
He believed both parties did a poor job of putting forth their best leaders.
Immediately surrounding all the government offices throughout the downtown are lots of apartments and hotels. Almost everyone is away pounding on doors and wearing out shoe leather.
All of the congressional staff probably are in the field working to keep their jobs—and the positions of their bosses.
The human traffic around the Capitol building was almost non-existent. Maybe the election already is over.
A poll in the “Nuseum” by CNN showed the debates had made very little difference to voters who previously had decided who they were voting for.
Our elections in Canada always come down to the last minute. But it appears the election in the U.S. for president is over.
The campaigning now is for down ballot candidates who will shape the House and Senate, as well as the governing bodies of all the States.

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