Donate to a good cause

Riverside Foundation for Health Care director Samantha Manty had approached our table one afternoon prior to the Canada Day Cash Lottery early-bird draw.
By the time she was finished, all eight of us had purchased tickets for the draw.
In the past, the Fort Frances Times and Rainy River Record have been actively involved in raising funds for the “Care Close to Home” campaign.
I had never imagined my family would need a great deal of the services the newspaper was campaigning for. Since then, however, I’ve come to understand how important those service have become to the district.
Major improvements were brought to the health centres in Fort Frances, Emo, and Rainy River, including dialysis and chemotherapy.
In the second major fundraising effort, a CT machine was acquired, which allowed doctors to order up a scan immediately and have it read by a radiologist on stand-by. The need to travel to Thunder Bay, Kenora, or Winnipeg was eliminated.
Since then, the big projects from the Riverside Foundation have been silent. But the work—and the results of the foundation—continue to benefit district residents.
I was not aware of several of these undertakings until recently.
Having spent a great deal of time in emergency over the past two weeks, I’ve been the beneficiary of the new IV pumps that have been pumping antibiotics directly into me over a three-hour period twice daily.
These new machines have replaced a much older generation of ones across the district. Up to three separate lines can be connected to a patient to receive several different infusions—they are remarkable.
I will be receiving antibiotics directly into my blood system for a longer period of time. My doctors ordered up that I had to receive a PIC line, which has made life much simpler for me by allowing me to carry my antibiotics on my back that are pumped into me 24 hours a day.
I was able to move away from spending three hours twice a day in emergency, which, in turn, has freed up a room there.
Up until a couple of years ago, a surgeon and operating room were required in Fort Frances to install a PIC line. In Thunder Bay, nurses who had received special training were able to install the PIC line outside of the operating room.
The Riverside Foundation picked up the costs of training two Fort Frances nurses to learn and develop the skills of inserting a PIC line into a patient. Two or three times a month, those two nurses are installing PIC lines into patients for chemotherapy or antibiotic treatments.
The scheduling of the installing PIC lines is more open. Patients do not have to leave the district for that service. Because I now have a pump in a packsack delivering my meds, I have been able to resume almost a normal lifestyle.
It is another case of the Riverside Foundation delivering services that bring care “close to home” for district residents.
I encourage you to buy a ticket for the Canada Day draw and to support the La Verendrye Hospital Auxiliary, which once again is holding a draw for a boat, motor, and trailer package in conjunction with the Fort Frances Canadian Bass Championship next month.

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