District among most generous

For over a decade, the staff at the newspaper has adopted a family for Christmas.
A list is provided with the ages and genders of members of the family. A suggested list of groceries is s
upplied including all the trimmings for a wonderful Christmas dinner and breakfasts for several days.
The staff always fills the order and adds extra gift items for the kids. There are several businesses and organizations across the district which provide similar Christmas family baskets.
This year, the Duane Cridland family and staff of Flint House have stepped forward to coordinate and host the annual community Christmas dinner at Knox United Church.
This meal has been ongoing for almost three decades.
I have volunteered twice to ring the bells for the Salvation Army this year.
I didn’t know quite what to expect but learned of the generosity of the community.
One particular lady told me that every time she exited Safeway or Walmart with change in her pocket, she paused and put the change in the red kettle.
Parents with children in their carts would hand some change to their child and instruct them to put the coins into the kettle.
Those were precious moments as one generation was passing onto the next the idea that everyone could be generous.
Bell ringers can be found in Rainy River and Emo as well as Fort Frances.
On Saturday, the OPP, EMS, and Border Services joined together for “Sutff-a-Cruiser,” asking for donations of food, toys, and clothing to be donated to families in need.
Every community participated and vehicles were filled. The district is generous not only at Christmas, but year-round.
Throughout the year, suppers have been held and donations received for families who have lost their homes to fire.
Other suppers were held for families with members in care away from Fort Frances.
In every case, the communities have responded with support and aid.
I listened intently Monday morning to Superior Morning as the logistics of moving food items to northern reserves was discussed with the principles of Wasaya Air, Bearskin, and Perimeter Airlines.
Thousands of pounds of goods will fly north and will be distributed in time for Christmas.
Our district is not alone in being generous, but I believe that the people of the Rainy River District are the most generous in the province.
Being generous is not just donating cash or items, it can be the offering of time.
The Cridland family will need support on Christmas Day to serve the food.
They may need drivers to deliver meals to those who can’t make their way to Knox United Church for the meal.
The Salvation Army needs people almost every hour of the day to ring the bells for kettles located in the community.
How generous can you be? Can you spare a dime or an hour of time? It will all be welcomed.

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