Didn’t cross my fingers long enough

We can hardly wait to get to our cottages and cabins, though people on mainland with roads to their cabins have had a significant jump on “islanders.”
Last Wednesday evening, Marnie and I launched our boat and headed to our cabin on the south arm of Rainy Lake. It has been a long seven months.
It was clear running, although ice had piled up on the west side of islands and rocks from the winds of the previous day. As we neared our island, the bay leading to the dock was iced in with shards of ice and small ice sheets.
I slowed as Marnie had never travelled through ice with a boat.
I eased the bow of the boat into the ice, which opened and spread around the boat as we motored forward. Ice completely surrounded the dock but we were able to reach it.
The warmth of the late-afternoon sun filled the sunroom of the cabin. Sitting on the deck, you could hear the tinkling of the ice as it rose and fell in the light winds.
Nothing had been disturbed over the winter months and we would be at the lake for the long weekend. I chose to take Friday off to open up the cabin and get things ready.
Power had to be turned on, outdoor furniture had to be moved up onto the deck, and the beds had to be made. And water had to be restored.
I, like everyone, has to cross my fingers and pray to the god of water pumps that the water will flow. There probably are a million and one things that can go wrong in starting a water pump.
In the past, we’ve had a foot valve pull out by ice action. We have had holes in the pipe that goes from the pump to the cabin. We have had pipes from the lake wear thin rubbing again the rocks in low water.
We have had O-rings break down. We have had circuit breakers fail, along with cracked pressure gauges that allowed air into the system. We have had pipes burst because they were not drained properly the previous fall.
This year, with only a year-old pump, the water system should have been easy to get going.
Alas, after several attempts to get the water moving, close examination of the intake pipe showed a slow leak. The hole was no bigger than a 1/16th in diameter, but that was enough to bring air into the system.
As such, the system could not suck up water. The leak may have been there last year, but would have been underwater when the new pump was installed.
Over the years, knowing all the problems that can exist in getting pumps to work, I have a shelf of two or three of everything (I know that I’m not alone). Extra foot valves, extra check valves, extra pipes, and pipe fittings fill the shelf.
I chose to simply put a new pipe into the water, which I’ll connect to the existing pipe when the water warms up.
That simple fix, and priming the pump again, had the system operating and pushing water. We always run the pump for a while to rid the system of any rust, as well as clean out silt that may have built up.
Valves were opened to the hot water system and the tank filled. The water filtration and purification system was up and running. Life was good.
Suddenly, the pump shut off. When the pressure gauge called for water, the pump started up again but water did not run. Water existed everywhere in the system but was moving nowhere.
The pressure gauge at the pump indicated no pressure was building up.
We returned to the bucket system, heating kettles and pots of water on the stove. You don’t realize how much you miss running and hot water until you don’t have it.
Obviously, I didn’t cross my fingers long enough.
The pump, meanwhile, is at the pump doctor. Hopefully, it can be fixed so it can again be up and running for this coming weekend.

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