Choices won’t be easy

The world has come together in Paris and reached a goal of limiting global warming to two degrees Celsius.
It is a lofty goal—one not guaranteed by treaties between the 200 nations but rather optimistically hoped for.
The new Trudeau government has set a deadline of 90 days to consult with all provincial governments on how Canada is going to meet the goals set out in the Paris Accord.
The Ontario government has shut down all the coal-fired generating plants in the province, replacing those fossil fuel users to fossil fuel natural gas and fossil fuel pellet and hog fuel generating stations.
Natural gas, pellets, and hog fuel also are carbon fuels that produce greenhouse gases. The government has chosen natural gas because it produces less greenhouse gases than does coal or oil.
Pellet and hog fuel hydro generating plants are considered “green” because the fuel is regenerated.
An environmental group is asking the Canadian government to ban all carbon fuels by 2040. Some communities already have banned the burning of wood in wood stoves and fireplaces.
How will that affect Canadians and people living in the district? Will all oil and gas furnaces be converted to electricity—and what will those costs be to homeowners.
Both Alberta and Saskatchewan are highly-dependent on coal-fired hydro generating plants. What will those provinces options be? Will environmentalists permit those two provinces to build nuclear power generating plants that produce no greenhouse gases?
Currently, 30 percent of Ontario’s power is generated through nuclear power plants.
The Ford Motor Company is betting its future on electrical vehicles and plans to roll out 13 new ones, which will make up 40 percent of its new vehicles by 2020.
In its announcement, Ford said it has developed a vehicle with a 150-km range that can be recharged to 80 percent in just 30 minutes.
Electrical vehicle (EV) distances will improve in time, but based on current mileage, a trip to Thunder Bay will take almost an extra two hours.
The Tesla P85, meanwhile, has a range of 480 km but cold-weather driving greatly diminishes its range.
In cold weather, running the lights, heating the interior, and keeping the windshield clear can diminish the travelling distance by as much as 35 percent. The distance ranges diminish if you are travelling hilly or mountainous roads, meeting headwinds, or using the air conditioner in the summer.
The world today travels by air. Is there a fuel alternative to power jets, or a battery system to lift the jets and fly across oceans and countries?
Life will become more difficult for Canadians as the country develops plans to meet or exceed its commitments. Will the government develop more rapid high-speed electrical train systems to move Canadians across the country?
Will Canadians be expected to pay increased taxes to develop electrical-powered bus systems to connect smaller communities to larger centres?
There are thousands of other questions Canadians will have to consider when choosing to give up carbon fuels. We will have to make choices to which industries and communities Canada will allow the use of carbon fuels.
The choices will not be easy.

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