Cabin part of all our lives

I am sitting in the sun porch of our cabin. A light breeze out of the north is rustling the needles of the pines. A woodpecker is nearby batting its head against a tree to get at some bugs. The Bearskin flight to Thunder Bay just flew overhead.
I am well into my first cup of coffee of the day. Not a cloud can be seen in today’s sky.
The cabin is slowly coming to life.
My nephew, Rob, was up early. His fiancée, Allison Musson, just exited the bedroom full of smiles with her bubbly personality and dance in her step letting everyone know that today is already a great day.
My son, Adam, who introduced his fiancée, Meesun Shin, to the family late Saturday night is in the sleeping cabin. My older son is still asleep.
The younger generation enjoyed the wood fired hot tub late into the evening on Monday.
It has been a family weekend at the lake. My mother made her first visit to the cabin this year on Sunday morning and stayed through Monday evening. I believe the enticement was visiting with her grandchildren and their fiancés.
Meesun is from South Korea and Adam is introducing her to Canada. Coming from such a crowded country, she was surprised in Winnipeg by the wide-open spaces. She arrived at the cabin on the lake in darkness. It wasn’t until the next morning that she could see all the islands and white and red pine trees growing up out of the rocks.
Travelling 9,900 km is a long distance from home. But at 10:30 Saturday night, she was speaking on Skype to her parents in Paju, Korea, who were enjoying a sweltering Sunday afternoon.
Adam’s one request on coming home was to have meat. Meat as North American’s like is not as readily available in Korea. And Sunday night with Phil and Carol Greif from Tucson, who have been friends of the family joining us, 12 huge steaks hit the grill.
The table in the sunroom accommodated all 12 of us.
It was a fun family evening. Laughter, smiles, and teasing broke out around the table.
And Monday, with just the Plumridge and Cumming families around the table, the conversation was punctuated by hilarious outbursts of laughter as the two young couples explained how the males proposed to their future brides.
And then they demanded of their parents and grand mother the details of their engagement proposals. Only at a table with everyone around it, might you suspect a conversation like that.
For Meesun, it was an affirmation that Adam had a family that was close and welcoming of her. And when she passed on the details of the weekend to her mother Monday night of the family get together, it helped ease the worries of her parents who had encouraged her daughter to travel with Adam to Canada.
Family is important in Korea. And I hadn’t realized how important our small family is to us.
We see the next generation growing and changing. The cabin is all part of their lives.
For Allison and Meesun, the cabin on Rainy Lake is part of their connection to their future spouses.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail