Assisted living is not inexpensive

For three days, my wife and I are living in an assisted living complex as we visit my mother-in-law.
It is a beautiful building with a huge dining room. An activities co-ordinator plans group activities daily and the residents are given lots of advance notice.
Monday could begin with an exercise session and through the day, knitting classes, Bingo, billiards, and a movie night will take place.
There also are lots of choices at meal time. If you are under the weather, it can be arranged for meals to be brought to your suite.
General cleaning is looked after by the staff. The building is well-maintained and the flower beds are gorgeous. Huge mom baskets and pots decorate in front of all the first-floor suites.
One is responsible for your personal laundry. Trips can be arranged to malls in the city but that is in addition to your monthly rent.
Trips to see the fall leaf colours already are planned but those trips are extra, as well.
As guests with my mother-in-law, we are billed for each night’s accommodation and for each meal we eat. The meals are tasty and nicely presented, and the staff is very accommodating.
Assisted living is not inexpensive. The complex is operated by a for-profit corporation. There is no subsidy by either the provincial government or the federal government for residents or the corporation.
The building pays real estate taxes to the City of Waterloo.
In the Waterloo region, assisted living complexes are very competitive when it comes to attracting clients. Often the biggest consideration comes in the services offered.
CCAC is available to residents but if one requires more care, yet still are able to live independently, those extra services can be bought at some of the facilities.
Rates can run from about $3,000 per month for a single person living in a bachelor suite to more than $6,500 for a single person requiring more personal care. Couples in good health probably will pay $4,500 per month.
In the residence we are staying in, many still have and operate their own cars.
There have been several starts for seniors’ assisted housing in Fort Frances. But the question always returns to can we fill such a complex with 140 suites in the community?
Will residents be prepared to pay $3,000-$5,500 for a basic suite with meals and co-ordinated activities?

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