Are eggs good or bad for me?

I have a confession to make. I really like a ham-and-cheese omelet.
I also enjoy my “Egg McMuffin,” my Tim Horton sausage-and-egg breakfast sandwich, and Subway’s sausage-and-egg breakfast meal on flat bread.
One of my treats at the cabin on the weekend is a big breakfast of bacon, eggs, and toast. I like dipping my toast into the yolk and sopping up the yellow.
I limit myself to one of those meals a week because when I look at the calories and fat, I really know the meal is not good for me. But I do enjoy those rich calories.
Eggs again are coming under scrutiny.
The first charge against eating eggs occurred back in the 1970s. Anyone with high cholesterol was told to rid their diets of eggs.
A new study out by the University of Western Ontario in London this month now claims that eating eggs may be as harmful as smoking.
The prevailing wisdom was that the cholesterol found in the yolk was really bad and would lead to heart attacks. Part of that wisdom changed in 2010 when a Harvard study found that eating one egg a day did not increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke in healthy men.
They did continue to suggest that anyone suffering from diabetes should keep their egg intake to whites only. Diabetics should think twice about eating an egg a day.
Last November, a University of Cambridge study found that the nutrients in egg whites helped to kick-start the body into burning calories. A month earlier, California researches following more than 27,000 men found that over a 14-year period, those men may have an increase in a lethal form of prostrate cancer.
Another study suggested eating eggs for breakfast helps to reduce calorie intakes through the rest of the day and kept hunger at bay through to lunchtime.
Many diets use eggs as a choice to help you lose weight. Eggs are a whole protein source, are rich in Vitamins A and D, and provide nutrients for blood cell production.
Some studies say you can eat an egg a day. Others say you should not have more than 2.5 eggs per week.
Eggs in the 1960s had joined other bad foods. The cholesterol in many foods was looked upon as an artery-clogging chemical. Those foods included avocados, mushrooms, and peanuts.
More recent studies have discovered all kinds of beneficial nutrients in those foods—and even in coffee. Even chocolate now is considered a health food.
Even eating peanut butter, which I enjoy spread across toast, is now associated with lower total cholesterol and lower triglycerides, which lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease.
All of this has me confused. Is a once-a-week meal with eggs dangerous to my health? Will it mean that piles of egg salad sandwiches will go uneaten at funerals?
And looking at all the benefits of eggs, I wonder sometimes how they get such a bad rap. I guess I’ll wait for another month, when a new study will come out saying we should include more eggs in our diet.
In the mean time, I’ll keep eating those wonderful egg breakfasts.

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