Seeking civil debate

A free and open democracy requires strong and open debate on policies and ideas. “Axe the tax” has an easy ring to the ear and quickly denounces the carbon tax that has been implemented by the federal government. It is easily understood by Canadians and is a focal point of Pierre Poilievre’s condemnation of this Liberal policy. In removing the tax as he has promised if his party forms the government, what policy would he implement to reduce Canada’s carbon emissions? What policies would the Conservative party implement to reduce climate change?

British Columbia has created an alternative method to reduce carbon emissions and its citizens are exempt from the federal carbon tax.

In Canada we are heading into an election sometime in 2025 and all three parties are campaigning like the election will come in the next six weeks.

Poilievre is blaming all of Canada’s problems on one person. Supposedly that person is responsible for inflation, the housing crisis, the health care crisis, and understaffing in our military. He was probably blamed for the rain and cloud cover preventing Canadians from witnessing the solar eclipse. If only a single person was that powerful.

The Conservatives may be ahead in the polls at the present, but the Liberals are dropping budget spending information to win voters back. One of their plans is to spend $1.5 billion to stabilize rental rates by buying up existing rental units. The RBC report notes that a shortage of rental units has caused rental rates to exceed inflation rates. Perhaps that $1.5 billion would be better spent building additional units to create higher vacancy rates. CMHC has noted that Canada will require 3.5 million new units by 2030. Those new units must be affordable. The new units will force older homes, condominiums and apartments to decrease in value.

Reaching those goals will require attracting more immigrants with trade skills. It will require making the movement of trades people easier to move from province to province. The Liberal government has also promised $6 billion for the provinces and municipalities to expand infrastructure through the construction of roads, sewer and water. Those funds will require the cooperation of provinces and municipalities to change zoning bylaws and accelerate approval processes for new sub-divisions.

The policies announced are progressive and appear funded to tackle issues important to Canadians. The issue remains that the Conservatives are only criticizing those policies and are not putting forth ideas or policies to tackle those issues that are important to Canadians. A healthy democracy should demand debate and would create a choice of ideas and policies. With more ideas on the table, even better solutions would be created by the government.