Wednesday, January 28, 2015

People

Mourners told to live life to fullest

ST. ALBERT, Alta.—The sister of an Alberta Mountie told mourners at his funeral yesterday that he would want them to live life the way he did—with joy, with passion, and with every effort to make the world a better place.

Ex-MP seeks mistrial

PETERBOROUGH, Ont.—Former Conservative MP Dean Del Mastro is seeking to have a mistrial declared in his election overspending case.
Del Mastro, a former parliamentary secretary to Prime Minister Stephen Harper, was convicted last fall of violating the Canada Elections Act during the 2008 election.
He resigned his House of Commons seat two weeks after the verdict.

Tories defend family-friendly measures

OTTAWA—Canada’s finance minister insists low- and middle-income families will see two-thirds of the benefits from the Harper government’s contentious multi-billion-dollar tableau of family-friendly measures.
By that measure, Joe Oliver is suggesting families with annual incomes as high as $120,000 qualify as “middle class.”

First female bishop for Church of England

LONDON—The male monopoly in the leadership of the Church of England ended today as the 500-year-old institution consecrated its first female bishop.
The Rev. Libby Lane became the eighth Bishop of Stockport in a service at York Minster.
Her consecration comes after the church ended a long and divisive dispute by voting last year to allow women to serve as bishops.

Church of England consecrates first female bishop, ending all-male leadership in institution

LONDON — Male domination in the leadership of the Church of England ended Monday, as the 500-year-old institution consecrated its first female bishop.
The Rev. Libby Lane became the eighth Bishop of Stockport in a service at York Minster. Her consecration comes after the church ended a long and divisive dispute by voting last year to allow women to serve as bishops.

Mayor vows to fight racism

WINNIPEG—The mayor of Manitoba’s capital tearfully promised yesterday to fight racism and intolerance after his city was branded Canada’s most racist by a national magazine.
Brian Bowman stood surrounded by dozens of aboriginal and community leaders, and admitted that Winnipeg has a problem with racism.

Wounded Mountie dies

ST. ALBERT, Alta.—An Alberta RCMP officer who was shot in the head during a routine investigation in a community just outside Edmonton over the weekend has died.
Police said Cst. David Matthew Wynn died in hospital yesterday morning.

Unsupervised kids more active: study

TORONTO—Children permitted to play outdoors on their own or with friends are getting more physical activity than kids who constantly are supervised, a new Canadian study suggests.

British code breaker Alan Turing’s notebook heads to auction

NEW YORK — A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated “The Imitation Game,” is going on the auction block.

California boy, 13, builds Braille printer with Lego kit, starts company with Intel funding

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — In Silicon Valley, it’s never too early to become an entrepreneur. Just ask 13-year-old Shubham Banerjee.
The California eighth-grader has launched a company to develop low-cost machines to print Braille, the tactile writing system for the visually impaired. Tech giant Intel Corp. recently invested in his startup, Braigo Labs.

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