Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Illegal workers turned back at border here

In June, Canada Border Services Agency officers at the Fort Frances port of entry processed 138,682 travellers in 66,729 vehicles.
That represented a two percent increase in travellers and a one percent decrease in vehicles from last June.

More than 617 international travellers entered by bus.
CBSA officers at the Rainy River port of entry, meanwhile, processed 32,174 travellers in 17,894 vehicles in June—representing a one percent decrease in travellers and a one percent increase in vehicles from June, 2013.
In June, officers at the Fort Frances POE conducted more than 2,658 immigration interviews, resulting in four visitor records, 53 work permits, and 52 temporary resident permits.
In 58 cases, individuals decided to voluntarily withdraw their applications to enter Canada.
During that same period, officers at the Rainy River POE conducted more than 200 immigration interviews, resulting in one study permit, one work permit, and seven temporary resident permits.
In eight cases, individuals decided to voluntarily withdraw their applications to enter Canada.
On June 7, a group of six individuals from the U.S. arrived at the Fort Frances POE seeking entry into Canada for one week.
They were referred for an immigration interview.
During the exam, CBSA officers discovered they actually were a group of maintenance workers contracted by a cabin owner to perform renovations on his property.
They were importing roughly $20,000 worth of materials, such as toilets, countertops, and flooring.
None of the individuals were in possession of valid work permits, nor had they indicated the purpose of their trip was to work.
The individuals were deemed inadmissible for seeking to work illegally in Canada.
They were allowed to voluntarily withdraw their application to enter Canada and subsequently returned to the U.S. with their building supplies.
And on June 27, a U.S. resident was seeking entry into Canada at the Fort Frances POE and was referred for an immigration interview.
During the interview, officers discovered the traveller had convictions for driving under the influence, carrying a concealed weapon, resisting arrest, and four counts of sexual imposition.
The individual stated he did not recall any of these incidents and was not forthcoming with any details.
He was deemed inadmissible to Canada due to serious criminality.
He was allowed to withdraw his application to enter Canada and returned to the U.S.
Customs highlights
In June, CBSA officers at the Fort Frances POE conducted 7,808 secondary examinations for customs purposes or on behalf of other government departments, initiated 28 seizure actions, made three arrests, and issued additional written warnings for undeclared or undervalued goods.
CBSA officers at the Rainy River POE conducted 1,777 secondary examinations for customs purposes or on behalf of other government departments.
On June 3, a Canadian resident arrived at the Fort Frances POE and was referred for a secondary examination as officers had received a tip that this traveller was spotted removing goods from boxes, discarding the boxes, and concealing various items.
During the search, officers found $835.46 worth of numerous undeclared fishing rods and bait.
The items were seized for non-report and released back to the traveller upon payment of a $628 penalty.
Had all the goods been declared properly, the applicable taxes would have amounted to about $108.
And on June 10, a returning Canadian resident declared a boat, motor, and trailer package purchased in the U.S. and paid the applicable taxes.
After further processing, officers at the Fort Frances POE discovered additional goods, including fishing gear and life jackets totalling $565.34, were purchased and not declared.
The goods were seized for non-report and released back to the individual upon payment of a $169.60 penalty.
Had all the goods been declared properly, the applicable taxes would have amounted to $73.49.
The CBSA reminds travellers to truthfully declare all purchases and goods received outside of Canada upon their return.
Smuggling, undervaluation, and other Customs Act offences may lead to seizure and/or prosecution.

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