Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Health & Wellness

First human study of Canadian-made Ebola vaccine to start within a few weeks.

TORONTO — The company that has licensed a Canadian-made Ebola vaccine says it hopes to start a Phase 1 trial on the serum within the next few weeks.
The safety data the trial produces could allow the World Health Organization to start using between 800 and 1,000 doses of the vaccine which Canada has donated for the Ebola outbreak response.

By mapping Ebola’s deadly DNA, scientists seek answers to what makes it tick, how it exploded

WASHINGTON — A single funeral caused many.

Mentally ill need help, not handcuffs: report

VANCOUVER—There has been a significant increase in the number of interactions between police and people with mental illness over the past five-seven years, says a new report by the Mental Health Commission of Canada.
Law enforcement agencies across the country repeatedly have warned that police are becoming the first line of contact for the mentally ill.

Tripping on treadmills? Scientists make seniors slip in lab to see if it can stop future falls

CHICAGO — Researchers are tripping seniors on purpose, and it’s not some kind of warped practical joke.
The experiment is among techniques being studied to prevent falls, the leading cause of injury in older adults. Falls in the elderly cost $30 billion yearly to treat and can send them spiraling into poor health and disability.

Stem-cell transplant eases symptoms of rare ‘stiff person syndrome’: study

TORONTO — Canadian doctors have begun using stem cell transplants to treat “stiff person syndrome,” a rare neurological condition in which a patient’s leg and other muscles suddenly contract painfully, often leaving them immobilized like a tin soldier.

Best polio vaccine? Oral and injectable, used in tandem, new study says

TORONTO — For decades scientists have debated whether injectable or oral polio vaccine is the best option for trying to finish the job of eradicating polio. Now a new study offers an answer: both.

End-of-life care must be priority

OTTAWA—Doctors tackled the delicate question of medically assisted death on Tuesday at a session devoted to end-of-life care at the annual conference of the Canadian Medical Association.
Long lines of physicians queued up to share their opinions on how end-of-life conditions for ailing Canadians must change as the population ages.

Aid group: American who had Ebola has recovered; hospital to discuss both patients’ discharge

ATLANTA — At least one of the two American aid workers who were infected with the Ebola virus was to be discharged Thursday from an Atlanta hospital, a spokeswoman for the aid group he was working for said.
Meanwhile, Emory University Hospital planned to hold a news conference Thursday morning to discuss both patients’ discharge.

Doctors debate end-of-life care at Canadian Medical Association meeting

OTTAWA — Doctors tackled the delicate question of medically assisted death on Tuesday at a session devoted to end-of-life care at the annual conference of the Canadian Medical Association.
Long lines of physicians queued up to share their opinions on how end-of-life conditions for ailing Canadians must change as the population ages.

Feds slapping stronger warning labels on opioids

OTTAWA—The federal government is putting stronger warning labels on extended-release painkillers like OxyContin in an effort to prevent the abuse of opioids.
“Too many people are abusing prescription drugs,” Health Minister Rona Ambrose told the annual conference of the Canadian Medical Association today.
“Too many people are suffering and dying as a result.”

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