Friday, March 27, 2015

Health & Wellness

Rapid test speeds up access to tuberculosis treatment in Nunavut, study finds

TORONTO — A study has shown that a new rapid tuberculosis test can change treatment in Nunavut, where rates of the disease are among the highest in the country.
Next-day results are now available, whereas it previously took at best a week, and often several, to diagnose the disease.

Social media can contribute to the winter blues: professor

HALIFAX — People in storm-battered Atlantic Canada might be fixated on winter, but a psychology professor says tweeting about it isn’t the best way to blow off steam.
Holly Seniuk of the University of New Brunswick said Thursday many people experience increased anxiety, depression, anger and stress during the winter months.

Fresh blood no better for transfusions: study

TORONTO—Freshly-donated blood is not better than older blood when it is transfused into severely-ill patients, a new Canadian-led study reports.
The findings will be a relief to blood collection agencies, which have faced calls to shorten the length of time blood can be stored before it is transfused.
In fact, Canadian Blood Services said they were very pleased with the outcome.

Study: Fast-food curb in South Los Angeles failed to reduce obesity rates or improve diets

LOS ANGELES — A much-hailed law that restricted the opening of new stand-alone fast-food restaurants in one of the poorest sections of Los Angeles did not curb obesity or improve diets, a new study found.

Fresh blood no better for transfusions, Canadian-led study shows

TORONTO — Freshly donated blood is not better than older blood when it is transfused into severely ill patients, a new Canadian-led study reports.
The findings will be a relief to blood collection agencies, which have faced calls to shorten the length of time blood can be stored before it is transfused. In fact, Canadian Blood Services said they were very pleased with the outcome.

Pharmacare could save cash: analysis

TORONTO—A national pharmacare program wouldn’t break the bank and should, in fact, save taxpayers billions of dollars, a new analysis suggests.
Spending on prescription drugs in Canada could drop by 32 percent, or $7.3 billion, if the country adopted a universal public drug plan, the authors said in the article, published yesterday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Pharmacare could save cash: Experts say program could cut drug spending by $7.3B

TORONTO — A national pharmacare program wouldn’t break the bank and should in fact save taxpayers billions of dollars, a new analysis suggests.
Spending on prescription drugs in Canada could drop by 32 per cent or $7.3 billion if the country adopted a universal public drug plan, the authors said in the article, published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Research to probe possible cancer protection genes

Can certain genes protect people from cancer? One of the country’s top research organizations is hoping to find out.
The Canadian Cancer Society has commissioned geneticists in British Columbia to assess the genes of some of the country’s healthiest people.

National vaccination database needed to prevent outbreaks

ST. JOHN’S, N.L.—As Quebec health officials deal with a measles outbreak affecting 119 people, a new study says Canada needs a national database to help prevent and deal with future incidents.
“A key step forward is to track immunization status from birth,” said Colin Busby, co-author of “A Shot in the Arm: How to Improve Vaccination Policy in Canada.”

New research on ‘super seniors’ to probe whether cancer protection genes exist

Can certain genes protect people from cancer? One of the country’s top research organizations is hoping to find out.
The Canadian Cancer Society has commissioned geneticists in British Columbia to assess the genes of some of the country’s healthiest people.

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